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fiAROLD  B.  LEE  LIBRARY 

BRIGHAM  YOUNG  Lr>,l\'ER&IT\ 

PROVO.  UTAH 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 
in  2011  with  funding  from 
Brigham  Young  University 


http://www.archive.org/details/honnelotsofearlysOOhopk 


The  Home  Lots 


OF  THE 


EARLY  SETTLERS 


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WITH    NOTES    AND    PLATS. 


BY 


CHARLES  WYMAN  HOPKINS. 


PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 

June,  1886. 


Copyright  by 

Charles  W.  Hopkins, 

1886. 


Providence  Press  Comfany,  Printers. 


TABLE    OF    CONTENTS. 


PAGE. 

PAGE. 

Introduction, 

V 

William  Reynolds,     . 

38 

Roger  Williams  and  the 

Daniel  Abbott,    . 

.              38 

Settlement  at  Providence, 

I 

Chad  Brown, 

39 

The  Home  Lots,    . 

19 

John  Warner, 

•       41 

Gregory  Dexter, 

•                19 

George  Rickard, 

42 

Matthew  Waller, 

20 

Richard  Scott,     . 

42 

Thomas  Painter, 

21 

William  Field, 

43 

Edward  Manton, 

21 

John  Field, 

•       44 

John  Greene,  Jr., 

22 

Joshua  Winsor, 

44 

Benedict  Arnold, 

22 

Thomas  Harris,  . 

•       45 

Francis  Wickes, 

•          23 

Adam  Goodwin, 

.    45 

William  Arnold, 

23 

William  Burrows, 

.      .       46 

Thomas  James,    . 

•          25 

William  Mann, 

47 

John  Greene,  Sr.,  '    , 

25 

William  Wickenden, 

•       47 

John  Smith, 

.          26 

Nicholas  Power, 

48 

Widow  Reeve, 

27 

Joane  Tyler, 

.       49 

Joshua  Verin, 

•          27 

Jane  Sears, 

49 

Roger  Williams, 

29 

Thomas  Hopkins, 

.       50 

John  Throckmorton, 

.          29 

Edward  Hart, 

50 

William  Harris, 

30 

Matthew  Weston, 

•       50 

Alice  Daniels, 

•          31 

John  Lippitt, 

51 

John  Sweet, 

31 

Hugh  Bewit, 

■       51 

William  Carpenter. 

•          32 

Robert  West, 

53 

Robert  Cole, 

32 

William  Hawkins, 

.       54 

Thomas  Olney,    . 

.       33 

Christopher  Unthank, 

54 

Thomas  Angell, 

34 

Robert  Williams, 

•       55 

Francis  Weston, 

•       35 

Original  Owners  of  the 

Richard  Waterman,  . 

36 

Providence  Plantations, 

57 

Ezekiel  Holliman, 

.       37 

Index,    .... 

•       73 

Stukely  Westcott, 

•       37 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 


The  Parish  Church  at  Gwinear,  Cornwall,  England. 

Record  of  Baptism,  {facsimile.) 

Deed  from  Canonicus  and  Miantonomi  to  Roger  Williams. 

Deed  from  Roger  Williams  to  his  Associates,  (two-thirds  size.) 

General  Plan  of  Home  Lots. 

Plan  of  Home  Lots,  northern  section. 

Plan  of  Home  Lots,  southern  section. 

Plan  showing  Original  Water-line,  west  side  of  Providence  River. 


INTRODUCTION. 


THE  increasing  interest  in  matters  pertaining  to  the  early  history  of  Provi- 
dence which  the  near  approach  of  the  two  hundred  and  fiftieth  anniversary 
of  the  settlement  of  the  town  has  occasioned,  induces  the  writer  to  present 
the  following  "  Plan  of  the  Home  Lots  "  of  the  early  settlers  of  Providence,  the 
founders  of  our  Commonwealth  and  the  ancestors  of  thousands  of  the  citizens  of 
Rhode  Island.  Such  brief  notes  and  extracts  from  the  public  records,  concerning 
the  persons  and  estates  as  are  of  general  interest  or  will  serve  to  illustrate  or 
verify  the  Plan,  have  also  been  added. 

Soon  after  the  settlement  of  Providence  in  1636,  the  territory  included  within 
the  limits  of  the  present  Olney,  Hope,  Wickenden,  North  and  South  Main 
streets,  comprising  perhaps  two  hundred  and  seventy-five  acres  of  land,  was 
divided  into  "shares"  or  "home  lots"  of  five  acres  each,  more  or  less,  extending 
from  the  "  Towne  Streete,"  now  North  and  South  Main  streets,  to  "  The  Highway 
at  the  head  of  the  lotts,"  now  Hope  street,  and  assigned  to  the  proprietors  and  by 
many  of  them  occupied  as  their  homesteads. 

For  many  years  the  location  of  a  large  number  of  these  homesteads  has 
remained  unidentified. 

Judge  Staples,  in  the  "  Annals  of  Providence,"  pages  34  and  36,  says :  "  With 
respect  to  the  first  division  of  land  in  'the  grand  purchase  of  Providence'  little  can 
be  gathered  from  the  records."  "  The  dividing  lines  between  all  these  lots  run  east 
and  west,  and  many  of  them  may  be  traced  by  the  walls  and  fences  now  [1843] 
standing.     Several  of  these  lots  have  never  been  transferred  by  deed." 


vi  INTRODUCTION. 


Mr.  Henry  C.  Dorr,  in  his  interesting  and  valuable  work,  "  The  Planting  and 
Growth  of  Providence,"  No.  15  of  the  series  of  "Rhode  Island  Historical  Tracts," 
pages  1 7  and  1 8,  states  that  "  The  early  allotment  of  the  homesteads  has  become 
involved  in  obscurity  through  the  loss  of  the  early  documents  of  the  town.  We 
know  not  how  soon  the  distribution  was  made,  or  the  mode  of  proceeding." 

The  late  Rev.  Edwin  M.  Stone,  the  author  of  "  Our  French  Allies,"  and 
other  works  relating  to  Rhode  Island  history,  in  "  The  Burning  of  Providence,"  an 
article  published  in  the  Providence  Journal,  April  10,  1876,  writes  as  follows  in 
regard  to  the  location  of  the  homesteads : 

"  Along  the  town  street  most  of  the  population  resided,  with  here  and  there  a 
townsman  living  some  distance  from  it.  It  is  impossible  to  fix  the  exact  location 
of  each  house,  yet  some  spots  may  be  pointed  out." 

"  We  have  been  at  much  pains  to  obtain  accurate  information  concerning  the 
home  lots  and  residences  of  the  first  settlers  of  the  town,  and  regret  that  we  are 
at  present  unable  to  make  it  complete." 

"  It  would  be  interesting  to  know  the  exact  spot  upon  which  each  of  the  fifty- 
four  proprietors  built  their  dwellings."  "  If  any  of  our  antiquarian  readers  can 
throw  further  light  upon  the  subject,  or  will  correct  any  error  in  statement  they 
may  discover  in  the  general  narrative,  we  shall  esteem  the  service  a  favor." 

The  "  History  of  Warwick,"  by  O.  P.  Fuller,  page  47,  locates  the  home  lot  of 
John  Warner  "near  where  the  'What  Cheer'  building  now  stands." 

Other  illustrations  might  be  given.  The  foregoing  are  sufficient,  however,  to 
show  the  vague  and  indefinite  character  of  the  information  which  has  for  a  long 
time  prevailed  concerning  this  subject.  Not  more  than  fifteen,  perhaps,  of  the 
original  fifty-two  home  lots  have  been  definitely  located,  the  remaining  thirty 
or  forty  having  become  lost,  apparently,  in  the  mists  of  two  centuries  and  a  half. 
It  is  believed  that  a  solution  of  this  problem  will  be  of  interest  and  of  practical 
use  in  tracing  the  titles  and  boundaries  of  the  early  estates  of  Providence. 


INTRODUCTION.  yii 


The  accompanying  plan  of  the  "  Home  Lots  "  is  founded  upon  a  record  con- 
tained in  a  little  book  in  the  office  of  the  City  Clerk,  Providence,  dated  1660, 
and  which  contains  a  list  of  the  "  Home  Lots,"  "  beginning  at  Mile-End  Cove." 
This  record,  torn  in  places,  and  partially  obliterated  by  long  use,  bears 
evidence  of  having  been  carefully  written  by  Roger  Williams,  and  is  reproduced 
in  the  appendix,  at  the  close  of  this  volume,  for  the  purpose  of  preservation  and  for 
convenient  reference. 

In  the  preparation  of  this  brief  summary  of  the  settlement  at  Providence,  the 
writer  has  been  materially  aided  by  the  kind  suggestions  of  a  number  of  gentlemen, 
too  numerous  to  be  mentioned  by  name,  to  all  of  whom  he  desires  to  express 
his  sincere  thanks  for  the  assistance  rendered. 


ENGRAVED    BY   CEO.   T.    SUTTER,    PROV.,    R.   I. 


The  Parish  Church  at  Gwinear,  Cornwall,  England. 

From  Photograph  taken  May,  1886,  expressly  for  this  work. 


ROGER   WILLIAMS 


AND    THE 


SETTLEMENT  at  PROVIDENCE. 


THE  purchase  of  the  "lands  and  meadows  upon  the  two  fresh  rivers,"  and 
the  settlement  at  Providence,  are  themes  intimately  connected  with  the 
record  of  the  lives  of  those  men  who,  twice  exiled  from  their  homes,  found 
at  last  an  asylum  upon  the  banks  of  the  Moshassuck.  The  beautiful  scene  which 
lay  spread  out  before  them  in  all  its  native  wildness,  as  they  for  the  first  time 
climbed  the  eastern  hillside  on  that  day  in  early  summer,  has  been  transformed 
as  if  by  magic.  They  themselves  have  long  since  passed  away,  and  in  place  of 
the  forest,  at  first  their  only  shelter,  stands  the  fair  City  of  Providence,  with  its 
thousands  of  happy  homes,  its  hum  of  industry,  and  its  temples  of  learning  and 
of  worship,  far  better  memorials  of  its  founders  than 

"Storied  urn  or  animated  bust." 

Roger  Williams,  pre-eminent  as  the  father  and  founder  of  the  colony  and  the 
great  apostle  of  religious  liberty,  was  born  of  Welch  parentage  about  the  year  1600. 
In  the  register  of  the  parish  church  at  Gwinear,  Cornwall,  may  be  found  the 
following  record : 


ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 


"Anno  do  1600 
*'  Roger  the  Second  Sonne  of  William  Williams  a  gent"  was 
baptized  the  xxiiii*  daie  of  Julye." 

He  was  educated  at  Cambridge  University,  and  chose  the  ministry  for  his  pro- 
fession. His  liberal  views,  however,  finding  too  narrow  limits  in  those  days  of 
intolerance,  forced  him,  in  common  with  other  persecuted  Puritans,  to  seek  an 
asylum  in  the  wilds  of  America. 

He  arrived  at  Boston,  with  his  wife,  Mary,'  on  the  fifth  of  February,  1 630-1, 
and  resumed  his  labors  in  the  ministry.  The  General  Court  disapproving  of  his 
teachings,  summoned  him  to  reply  to  charges  which  finally  resulted  in  his 
banishment. 

About  the  middle  of  January,  1635-6,  the  Court  having  decided  that  Williams 
should  be  sent  back  to  England,  he  hastily  bade  adieu  to  sympathizing  friends,  left 
his  wife  and  two  babes,  the  elder  about  two  years  of  age,  the  younger  but  three 
months,  and  braving  the  bitter  cold  and  deep  snow  of  a  New  England  winter, 
made  his  way  through  an  unbroken  wilderness  to  seek  shelter  and  safety  in  the 
territory  of  the  Narragansetts. 

In  a  letter  to  his  friend.  Major  Mason,  dated  Providence,  June  22, 1670,  he  says: 

"  When  I  was  unkindly  and  unchristianly,  as  I  believe,  driven  from  my  house, 
and  land,  and  wife,  and  children,  (in  the  midst  of  a  New  England  winter,  now  about 
thirty-five  years  past,)  at  Salem,  that  ever-honored  Governor,  Mr.  Winthrop,  pri- 
vately wrote  to  me  to  steer  my  course  to  the  Narragansett  Bay  and  Indians,  for 
many  high  and  heavenly  and  public  ends,  encouraging  me,  from  the  freeness  of  the 
place  from  any  English  claims  or  patents.  I  took  his  prudent  motion  as  a  hint 
and  voice  from  God,  and,  waiving  all  other  thoughts  and  motions,  I  steered  my 
course  from  Salem  —  (though  in  winter-snow,  which  I  feel  yet) — unto  these  parts, 
wherein  I  may  say  Peniel,  that  is,  I  have  seen  the  face  of  God." 

I.     Her  maiden  name  is  believed  to  have  been  Warnard.     (See  Knowles'  Memoirs  of  Roger  Williams,  ?•  31.) 


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SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE. 


He  obtained  from  Ousamequin,  also  known  as  Massasoit,  father  of  King  Philip, 
a  grant  of  land  at  Seekonk,  on  the  east  side  of  Pawtucket  River,  at  a  place  formerly 
called  "  Manton's  Neck,"  on  the  northern  bank  of  the  little  cove  which  is  the  out- 
let of  the  Ten  Mile  River. 

Here  he  was  joined  by  some  of  his  friends  from  Salem  and  began  to  "  build 
and  plant,"  but  being  kindly  informed  by  his  friend,  Governor  Winslow,  that  he 
was  still  within  the  bounds  of  the  Plymouth  Patent,  he  gave  up  his  new  resi- 
dence, and,  in  company  with  five  companions,  went  down  the  river  in  a  canoe, 
and  nearing  the  western  shore  of  the  river,  was  greeted  by  the  friendly  salutation 
of  the  natives,  "  What  Cheer,  Netopr  Here  they  landed  and  exchanged  greetings 
with  the  Indians.  Re-embarking,  they  passed  around  the  southerly  point  of  land, 
now  India  and  Fox  Points,  and  proceeding  up  the  Providence  River  disembarked 
at  a  place  where  they  found  a  spring  of  water  gushing  from  the  hillside. 
This  spot  they  selected  for  a  home,  and  in  grateful  remembrance  of  "  God's 
merciful  kindness  to  him  in  his  distress,"  the  town  thus  founded,  Roger  Williams 
named  Providence. 

This  was  in  the  spring  or  early  summer  of  1636,  generally  supposed  to  have 
been  in  the  latter  part  of  June.^  The  names  of  the  five  persons  who  accompanied 
Roger  Williams  at  this  time  are  William  Harris,  John  Smith  (the  miller),  Joshua 
Verin,  Thomas  Angell  and  Francis  Wickes.  These,  with  Mr.  Williams,  were  the 
first  settlers  of  Providence. 

True  to  the  principle  which  he  had  boldly  advocated  before  his  banishment, 
that  the  Indians  were  the  rightful  owners  of  the  land,  on  the  24th  of  March,  in  the 
second  year  of  the  Plantation,  Roger  Williams  procured  from  Canonicus  and 
Miantonomi,  sachems  of  the  Narragansetts,  the  deed  of  lands  purchased  two  years 
before. 

I.  Knowles'  Mem.  R.  W.,  pp.  102-103;  ^'so,  "  When  was  Providence  Founded.'"  in  the  Providence  Journal, 
January  25,  i886;  "The  True  Date  of  the  Founding  of  Providence,"  in  Book  Notes,  by  Sidney  S.  Rider,  Vol.  3, 
No.  26,  p.  127;  "  Founding  of  Providence,"  in  Evening  Telegram,  March  22,  1886. 


ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 


The  original  deed  is  so  dilapidated  as  to  be  partially  illegible,  but  the  Town 
Court  caused  approved,  copies  to  be  recorded  in  the  town  records,  and  those 
copies,  together  with  the  action  of  the  Court  in  regard  to  them,  are  as  follows : 

"The  Seventh  of   the   Twelfe  Month  1658 
At  our  Towne  Court ; 
William  Arnold  of   Pautuxet  Came  into 
this  presant  Court  and  did  acknowledge 
That  those  two  Coppies  (to  witt)  of  William 
Harrises  &  Thomas  Olneys  which  hath  these 
words  in  them  as  ffolloweth,  are  the  true 
words  of  that  writeing  Called  the  towne  Evi- 
-dence  of  Providence,  And  that  which  is  want- 
-ing  in  the  now  writeing  called  the  towne  Evi- 
-dence,  which  agreeth  not  with  those  two  Coppies 
was  torne  by  accident  in  his  house  at  Pautuxett. 

A  true  Coppye  of   the  Towne  Evidence, 
as  followeth. 

Att  Nanhiggansick,  The  24*''  of  the  first  Month 

Comonly  called  March  in  the  Second  yeare  of  our 

plantation,  or  planting  at  Moshausick,  or 

Providence. 

Memorandum,  That  wee  Caunanicusse  and 

Meiuuantunnomu  the  two  chiefe  Sachims 

of    Nanheggansuck,  haveing   Two  yeares 

since  sold  unto  Roger  Williams  the  lands  &  mead- 

-dowes  upon  the  two  fresh  Rivers  called  mow- 

-shausuck  &  wanasquatuckett,  doe  now  by  these 

presents  Establish  &  Confirme  the  bounds  of  those 

lands  from  the  Rivers  &  ffields  of   Pautuckett,  The 

great  hill  of   Neotaconkonitt  on  the  Norwest  and 


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SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE. 


the  towne  of  Mashapauge  on  the  west. 
As  also  in  Consideration  of  the  many  Kindness- 
-es  &  services  he  hath  continually  done  for  us  both 
with  our  friends  of  Massachusett,  as  also  at  Quinitik- 
-ticutt,  And  Apaum  or  Plimouth,  wee  doe  freely 
Give  unto  him  all  that  land  from  those  Rivers 
Reaching  to   Pautuxett  River,  as  also  the  Grasse 
&  meaddowes  upon  Pautuxett   River.     In  witnes 
where  of  wee  haue  hereunto  set  our  hands  in  the 
presence  of 


The  marke      d^    Caunanicusse 

The  mark  of       O 

Soatash 

of 

The  marke  of  i 

Assotemewett 

The  marke  of     \       Meiantenomu 

1639,  Memorandum.  3.  month.  9.  day.     This  was  all  againe 
confirmed  by  Miantenomu  he  acknowledged  this  his,  act 
and  hand  up  the  streame  of    Pautuckett  &  Pautuxett 
without  limmets  wee. might  have  for  our  use  of  Cattell. 
Wittnes  hereof  Roger  Williams 

Benedict  Arnold. 

Att  A  Towne  metting  March  the  6'  1659.  60 
Tho:  Olney  Sen""  Moderator. 

*     #     *     *     * 

ffor  as  much  as  William  Harris  hath  this  day 
desired  of   the  Towne  that  he  might  have  the 
Towne  Evidence  downe  to  Newport  haveing 
ocation  to  use  it  at  the  Court 

It  is  therefore  granted  that  the  clarke  shall 
delivere  the  said  Evidence  unto  the  said 
William  Harris;   and  the  said  William  Harris  shall 


ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 


deliver  the  said  Evidence  unto  the  clarke  again 
saffely  in  convenient  season  as  the  Towne     - 
shall  see  meette: 

if:  #  #  #  # 

The  Enrolement  of   the  wrighting  Called  the 
Towne  Evidence  after  it  was  defaced ;  (as  ffolloweth) 

Att   Nanhiggansick ;    the  24""  of   the  first    Month    Comonly  called 
March  the  2"*^  yeare  of  our  plantation,  or  planting  at 
Moshosick,  or  providence, 

Memorandum,  that  wee  Caunounicus,  &  Miantenomu  y*  2  cheife 
Sachims  of  Nanhiggansick  having  2  yeares  since  Sold  unto  Roger 
Williams  y^  landes  &  Meaddowes  upon  the  2  fresh  Rivers  called 
Moshosick  &  wanasquatuckett  doe  Now  by  these  presentes  Estab- 
lish, &  confirme  y^  boundes  of  those  landes  from  y*"  River  &  fieldes 
of  pautuckquitt,  y^  great  hill  of  Neotaconckonett  on  y^  Norwest, 
&  y'  Towne  of  Mashappauge  on  y*  West, 
in  wittnesse  where  of  wee  have  here  unto  Sett  our  handes 

V*  m''*  of    <w         ^    Caunounicus 


in  y^  presence  of 

yc  jj^ke    /      )    oi   Soatash 

yc  jj^ke    y*.,^^*    of  Asotemewitt 


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t 


^^  of       (        Miantenomu 


M''  3  Mont :    9  die  this  was  all  againe  confirmed   by   Miantenomu 

he  acknowledged  this  his  act  and  hand  up  the  streame  of  pautuckett 

and    Pautuxett   without    limmetts   we   might   have   for   our   use  of 

Cattle  wittnesse  here  of 

Benedict 

Roger  Williams:  Arnold 

Enroled  Aprill  y^  4*'':    1662:   p  me  Tho :  Olney  Jun"": 

Towne  Clerke. 


SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE. 


This  earliest  deed  upon  the  records  of  Providence,  after  the  transfer  by 
Roger  Williams  of  equal  rights  to  his  associates,  was,  in  1659,  confirmed  "to  the 
men  of  Providence  and  the  men  of  Pawtuxet,"  by  the  sachems,  successors  of 
Canonicus  and  Miantonomi.  These  deeds  of  confirmation  also  extended  the 
purchase  "  twenty  full  miles  from  a  hill  called  Fox's  hill,"  and  more  clearly 
defined  the  western  bounds  of  the  colony. 

Of  these  lands,  comprising  the  greater  portion  of  the  present  County  of  Provi- 
dence and  a  part  of  the  County  of  Kent,  Roger  Williams  was  at  first  the  sole 
purchaser  and  proprietor. 

He  asserts  that  "  It  is  not  true  that  I  was  employed  by  any,  was  supplied 
by  any,  or  desired  any  to  come  with  me  into  these  parts."  "  My  soul's  desire  was 
to  do  the  natives  good,  and  to  that  end  to  learn  their  language,  (which  I  afterward 
printed,)  and  therefore  desired  not  to  be  troubled  with  English  company ;"  that 
out  of  pity  he  gave  leave  to  several  persons  to  come  along  in  his  company. 
He  adds:  "I  mortgaged  my  house  in  Salem  (worth  some  hundreds)  for  supplies 
to  go  through,  and  therefore  was  it  a  single  business."  He  says  that  "  It  was  by 
God's  merciful  assistance,  I  was  the  procurer  of  the  purchase  and  not  by  means 
or  payments,  the  natives  being  so  shy  and  jealous  that  moneys  could  not  do  it, 
but  by  that  language,  acquaintance  and  favor  with  the  natives,  and  other  advan- 
tages which  it  pleased  God  to  give  me,  and  also  bore  the  charges  and  venture  of 
all  the  gratuities,  which  I  gave  to  the  great  sachems,  and  other  sachems  round 
about  us,  and  lay  engaged  for  a  loving  and  peaceable  neighborhood  with  them  to 
my  great  charge  and  travel." 

Mr.  Williams  thus  received  a  clear  title  to  these  lands,  and  might  have 
retained  them  if  he  had  so  desired.  Such,  however,  was  not  his  purpose.  He 
desired  rather  that  the  lands  so  purchased  at  his  own  expense  might  be  "for  a 
shelter  for  persons  distressed  for  conscience,"  a  colony  founded  upon  civil 
freedom,  where  all  might  worship  God  according  to  the  dictates  of  their  own 
conscience. 


8  ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 

Accordingly,  soon  after  his  purchase  he  executed  the  following  deed,  gener- 
ously dividing  the  land  equally  among  his  associates,  which  had  now  increased  to 
twelve  in  number,  "without  reserving  to  himself,"  as  he  afterwards  observed,  "a 
foot  of  land  or  an  inch  of  voice  more  than  to  my  servants  and  strangers." 

Memorandum  or  "  Initial  Deed  "  from  Roger  Williams  of  the  lands  purchased 
from  Canonicus  and  Miantonomi : 

"  Memorandum,  That  I,  R.  W.  having  formerly  purchased  of  Canonicus  and 
Miantonomi,  this  our  situation  or  plantation  of  New  Providence,  viz.  the  two 
fresh  rivers  Wonas.  and  Moosh.  and  the  grounds  and  meadows  thereupon,  in  con- 
sideration of  ;^30  received  from  the  inhabitants  of  said  place,  do  freely  and 
fully,  pass,  grant  and  make  over  equal  right  and  power  of  enjoying  and  disposing 
the  same  grounds  and  lands  unto  my  loving  friends  and  neighbors,  S  W. 
W  A.  T  J.  R  C.  J  G.  J  T.  W  H.  W  C.  T  O.  F  W.  R  W.  and  E  H. 
and  such  others  as  the  major  part  of  us  shall  admit  into  the  same  fellowship  of 
vote  with  us.  As  also,  I  do  freely,  make  and  pass  over  equal  right  and  power  of 
enjoying  and  disposing  the  said  land  and  ground  reaching  from  the  aforesaid 
rivers  unto  the  great  river  Pawtuxett,  with  the  grass  and  meadow  thereupon, 
which  was  so  lately  given  and  granted  by  the  two  aforesaid  sachems  to  me.  Wit- 
ness my  hand.    ^  R.  W."^ 

There  was  no  date  affixed  to  the  above  deed,  and  on  the  2  2d  of  the  loth 
month  [Dec],  1666,  Roger  Williams  executed  a  second  memorandum  of  his  pur- 
chase from  Canonicus  and  Miantonomi,  as  follows : 

"  The  Enrollment  of  a  Writing  signed  by  -Roger  Williams  as  followeth : 

"  Providence,  8*'' of  8*  M°""  1638.  (so  called.) 
"  Memorandum,  that  I   Roger  Williams   having   formerly  purchased  of   Cau- 
nouinicus  &   Miantinomue,  this  our  Situation,  or  Plantation  of  New  Providence 

1.     From  Staples'  Annals  of  Providence,  pp.  28-39. 


SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE. 


Viz,  the  two  fresh  rivers  Wanasquatuckett  &  Mooshausick  and  the  ground  & 
meadows  thereupon,  in  consideration  of  thirty  Pounds  received  from  the  Inhab- 
itants of  the  said  Place,  do  freely  &  fully  pass,  grant  &  make  over  equal  right  and 
power  of  enjoying  &  disposing  the  same  grounds  &  lands  unto  my  loving  friends 
&  neighbors,  Stukely  Westcott,  Wm.  Arnold,  Thomas  James,  Robert  Cole,  John 
Greene,  John  Throckmorton,  William  Harris,  William  Carpenter,  Tho:  Olney, 
ffrancis  Weston,  Richard  Waterman,  Ezekiel  Holliman  and  such  others  as  the 
Major  Part  of  us  shall  admit  into  the  same  fellowship  of  Vote  with  us.  As  also 
I  do  freely  make  and  pass  over  equal  right  and  power  of  enjoying  and  disposing 
of  the  lands  and  grounds  reaching  from  the  aforesaid  rivers  unto  the  great  river 
Pawtuxett  with  the  grass  and  meadows  thereupon,  which  was  so  lately  given  and 
granted  by  the  aforesaid  Sachims  to  me.     Witness  my  Hand, 

Roger  Williams." 

"  Providence,  22*^  10,  1666,  (so  called.) 

"  This  Paper  and  Writing  is  a  true  Copy  of  a  writing  given  by  me  about 
twenty-eight  years  since  and  differs  not  a  tittle  only  so  is  dated  as  near  as  we 
could  guess  about  the  time  and  the  names  of  men  (written  in  a  straight  of  time 
and  haste)  are  here  explained  by  me, 

Roger  Williams. 
"  In  the  presence  of  us 

John  Browne, 

John  Sayles, 

Thomas  Harris,  Assistant."' 

On  the  20th  of  December,  1661,  in  compliance  with  a  request  of  the  proprie- 
tors of  the  town  of  Providence,  Roger  Williams  executed  the  following  deed  in 
confirmation  of  the  initial  deed  : 

I.     Deeds,  &c.,  Trans.,  p.   190. 


lo  ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 

"  Be  it  Knowne  unto  all  men  by  these  presentes,  That  I  Roger  Williams 
of  the  Towne  of  Providence  in  the  Narragansett  Bay  in  New  England  having 
in  the  Yeare  one  Thousand  six  hundred  Thirtye  ffoure  And  in  the  Yeare  one 
Thousand  six  hundred  Thirtye  ffive,  had  severall  Treatyes  with  Counanicusse  And 
Miantenome,  the  Two  chiefe  Sachims  of  the  Narragansett ;  And  in  the  End  pur- 
chased of  them  the  ^mit^  and  ^<^i9^Um%  upon  the  Two  ffresh  Rivers  called 
Moshosick,  And  Wanasquatuckett  The  Two  said  Sachims  having  by  A  Deede 
under  theire  handes,  Two  Yeares  after  the  sale  thereof  Established,  And  Conffirmed 
the  Boundes  of  those  ||ianidiei$  ffrom  the  River  And  ff elides  of  Pautuckett,  the  great 
Hill  of  Neotaconkonitt  on  the  Norwest  And  the  Towne  of  Mashapaug  on  the 
west ;  Notwithstanding,  I  had  the  frequent  promise  of  Miantenomy  (my  Kind 
freind)  that  It  should  not  be  Land  that  I  should  want  about  these  Boundes  men- 
tioned, provided,  that  I  satisfhed  the  Indian ;  there  inhabeting ;  I  having  made 
Covenants  of  peaceable  neighbourhood  with  all  the  Sachims,  And  Natives  Round 
about  us.  And  having  in  A  sence  of  God's  mercifful  Providence  unto  me  in  my 
destresse,  call  the  place  Providence,  I  desired  it  might  be  for  A  shelter  for  persons 
destressed  for  Conscience;  I  then  considering  the  condition  of  Divers  of  my 
destressed  countrey  men ;  I  comunicated  my  said  purchase  unto  my  loving  ffreindes, 
John  Throckmorton,  William  Arnold,  William  Harris,  Stuckley  Westcott,  John 
Greene  Senior,  Thomas  Olney  Senior,  Richard  Watermane  And  others,  who  then 
desired  to  take  Shelter  here  with  me.  And  in  Succession,  unto  so  many  others  as 
we  Should  Receive  into  the  felloship,  And  Societye  of  injoyeing,  And  desposing 
of  the  Said  Purchase:  And  besides  the  fifirst  that  were  admitted,  our  Towne 
Recordes  declare,  that  afterwards  wee  Received  Chad  Browne,  William  ffield, 
Thomas  Harris  Senior,  William  Wickenden,  Robert  Williams,  Grigorey  Dexter, 
and  others  as  our  Towne  Booke  declares :  And  whereas  by  Code's  Mercifull  Assist- 
ance I  was  the  procurer  of  the  purchase  not  by  monies  nor  payment,  the  Natives 
being  so  shy,  And  jeloues  that  monies  could  not  do  it,  but  by  that  Language, 
Aquaintance,  And  favour  with  the  Natives,  And  other  Advantages  which  it 
pleased    God   to   give   me.  And  also  bore  the  charges.  And  Venture  of  all  the 


SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE.  u 


Gratuetyes  which  I  gave  to  the  great  Sachims,  And  other  Sachims  And  Natives 
Round  about  us :  And  Lay  ingaged  for  A  Loving  And  pecable  Neighbourhood 
with  them  all,  to  my  great  charge,  And  Travell ;  It  was  therefore  Thought  ffitt  by 
some  Loving  ffreindes,  that  I  should  Recieve  Some  Loving  consideration  And 
gratuetye;  And  it  was  agreed  between  us.  That  Every  person  that  should  be 
Admitted  into  the  ffelloship  of  injoying  Land  And  desposing  of  the  purchase 
should  pay  Thirtye  Shillings  unto  a  pubHque  Stock;  And  ffirst  about  Thirtye 
pounds  should  be  paid  unto  my  selfe,  by  Thirtye  Shillings  A  person,  as  They  were 
Admitted :  This  Sum  I  Received,  And  in  Love  to  my  ffreindes,  And  with  Respect 
to  A  Towne,  And  place  of  Succor  for  the  destresed  as  aforesaid,  I  doe  Acknowledg 
the  Said  Sum,  And  payment,  as  ffull  Sattisffaction ;  And  whereas  in  the  yeare  one 
Thousand  six  hundred  Thirtye  seauen  (so  called)  I  delivered  the  H^zt^t  subscribed 
by  the  Two  Aforesaid  cheife  Sachims  (so  much  thereof  as  concerneth  the  afor- 
mentioned  '%M,^t^  ffrom  my  selfe.  And  from  my  heires,  unto  the  whole  number 
of  the  purchasers,  with  all  my  powre.  Right,  And  Title  therein :  Reserving  only 
unto  my  selfe,  one  Single  Share  Equall  unto  any  of  the  Rest  of  that  number,  I  now 
Againe,  in  A  more  fformall  way  under  my  hand  and  Seale  conffirme  my  fformer 
Resignation  of  that  deede  of  the  ^aiuUlSi  aforsaid ;  And  Bind  my  selfe,  my  heirs, 
my  Exsecutors,  my  Administerators,  And  Assignes,  never  to  molest  any  of  the  said 
persons  Already  Received,  or  hereafter  to  be  Received  into  the  Society  of  pur- 
chasers as  aforsaid :  But  that  they,  theire  heirs,  Exsecutors,  Administerators,  And 
Assignes  Shall  at  all  tymes  quietly.  And  pecably  Injoy  the  premises.  And  Every 
part  thereof;  And  I  doe  ffurther  by  these  presentes.  Bind  my  selfe,  my  heirs,  my 
Exsecutors,  my  Administerators,  And  Assignes  never  to  Lay  any  claime,  nor  cause 
any  claime  to  be  Laid  to  any  of  the  |Eattd[^$  aformentioned,  or  unto  any  part,  or 
percell  thereof,  (more  than  unto  my  owne  Single  Share)  by  Vertue,  or  pretence  of 
any  fformer  Bargine,  Sale,  or  Morgage,  what  So  ever;  (or  jointers,  Thirdes,  or 
Intailes)  made  by  me  the  said  Roger  Williams,  or  of  any  other  person  Either  ffor, 
By,  Through,  or  under  me  |jtt  W\X\\\t$$%  thereof  I  have  hereunto  Sett  my  hand 
and  Seall  This  Twentyeth  day  of  December,  in  this  presant  yeare  One  Thousand 
Six  hundred  Sixty  one 


12  ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 

Memorandum  the  wordes:  of  the  purchase  was  Interlined  before  these  presantes 
was  Sealed  Roger  Williams, 

Signed,  Sealed  And  Delivered 
in  The  presence  of  us 

Thomas  Smith 
Joseph  Carpenter 

I    Mary  Williams,  wife  unto  Roger  Williams,  doe  Assent  unto 
the  premises,  Wittnes  my  hand  this   Twentieth  of  December 
in  this  presant  yeare  one  Thousand  Six  hundred  Sixty  one 
Accknowledged  And  Subscribed 
before  me  William  ffeild 

Gene""'  Assistant 

Mary 
The  marke  of  M  W,     _,^  „ 

Williams.  ' 

It  would  seem  from  this  deed  that  the  first  twelve  proprietors  were  admitted 
into  equal  ownership  of  the  lands  with  Roger  Williams  without  being  required  to 
furnish  any  equivalent  for  the  value  of  the  lands  received,  and  that  the  thirty 
pounds  which  were  paid  Roger  Williams  from  the  common  fund  created  by  the 
payment  of  thirty  shillings  by  each  of  the  succeeding  settlers  was  not  paid  as  an 
equivalent  for  the  land,  but  was  accepted  by  him  as  "a  loving  gratuity,"  and  that 
"  all  which  he  received  was  far  less  than  what  he  had  expended." 

For  the  lands  on  the  Pawtuxet  river  Mr.  Williams  received  twelve-thirteenths 
of  twenty  pounds  from  the  twelve  persons  named  in  the  deed  of  October  8,  1638. 

The  lands  thus  transferred  by  Roger  Williams  to  his  associates  were  divided 
into  two  parts,  which  were  known  as  "  the  grand  purchase  of  Providence  and  the 
Pautuxet  purchase." 

I.     From  the  original  in  the  office  of  the  Recorder  of  Deeds,  city  of  Providence. 


SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE.  13 

The  first  inhabitants  of  Providence  probably  "  settled  in  such  places  as  were 
most  convenient,  and  planted  their  corn  on  the  old  Indian  fields  as  they  could 
agree  among  themselves."  As  their  numbers  increased  it  became  necessary  to 
adopt  a  more  systematic  division  of  the  lands,  which  resulted  in  the  laying  out 
of  "the  Towne  Streete,"  now  North  and  South  Main  streets,  along  the  eastern 
shore  of  the  river,  and  dividing  the  land  eastward  of  the  street  into  lots  of  five 
acres  each,  more  or  less,  extending  easterly  to  "  the  highway,"  now  Hope  street. 
These  were  the  home  lots  or  shares  on  which  the  dwellings  of  the  proprietors 
were  located. 

The  home  lots  at  the  northern  portion  of  the  town,  near  the  place  where 
Roger  Williams  and  his  companions  landed,  were  laid  out  of  a  width  of  about 
one  hundred  and  twenty-two  feet.  Between  Dexter's  lane,  now  Olney  street,  on 
the  north,  and  the  ancient  "  highway  "  which  originally  separated  the  home  lots  of 
William  Carpenter  and  Robert  Cole,  now  Meeting  street,  on  the  south,  there  are 
nineteen  lots  of  an  average  width  of  about  one  hundred  and  twenty-two  feet,  and 
of  an  average  area  of  about  five  and  one-half  acres,  measured  by  the  "  eighteen 
foot  pole." 

The  lots  near  the  centre  of  the  town  being  much  longer,  were  considerably 
reduced  in  width.  From  Meeting  street  to  Power's  lane,  now  Power  street, 
originally  the  dividing  line  between  the  lots  of  William  Wickenden  and  Nicholas 
Power,  there  are  twenty-one  lots  of  an  average  width  of  about  one  hundred  and 
seven  feet,  and  an  average  area  of  a  little  more  than  five  acres. 

The  lots  near  the  southern  extremity  of  the  town  being  much  shorter,  were 
widened  to  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet,  more  or  less.  From  Power  street  to  the 
"  highway "  at  the  southern  extremity  of  the  town,  now  Wickenden  street,  there 
are  twelve  lots  of  an  average  width  of  about  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet,  and  of 
an  average  area  of  about  four  and  one-half  acres  each. 

These  divisions  correspond  very  closely  with  the  ancient  landmarks  which  may 
yet  be  identified,  as  will  appear  from  the  following  illustrations : 

3 


H 


ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 


The  distance  from  the  south  side  of  Meeting  street  to  the  north  side  of 
Thomas  street,  the  southern  boundary  of  the  home  lot  of  Thomas  Angell,  is  about 
three  hundred  and  twenty-one  feet,  comprising  the  three  lots  of  Robert  Cole, 
Thomas  Olney,  and  Thomas  Angell,  allowing  one  hundred  and  seven  feet  for  each. 

From  Thomas  street  to  the  northern  line  of  the  "What  Cheer"  building, 
which  occupies  the  site  of  the  home  lot  of  Daniel  Abbott,  is  about  five  hundred 
and  thirty-five  feet,  or  the  five  lots  of  one  hundred  and  seven  feet  each  originally 
laid  out  to  Francis  Weston,  Richard  Waterman,  Ezekiel  HoUiman,  Stukely  West- 
cott,  and  William  Reynolds. 

From  the  south  side  of  Power  street  to  the  northern  boundary  line  of  the 
ancient  burial  ground  of  the  Tillinghast  family,  a  well  defined  landmark,  the  dis- 
tance is  nearly  eight  hundred  and  forty  feet,  and  contains  seven  of  the  original  lots 
of  an  average  width  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet. 

From  the  last  mentioned  boundary  line  to  Wickenden  street  is  about  six 
hundred  feet,  comprising  five  lots  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet  each. 

These  measurements  are  all  approximate,  and,  as  the  variance  would  not  exceed 
a  very  few  feet,  are  sufficiently  definite  to  serve  the  present  purpose  and  to  illustrate 
in  a  general  way  the  plan  herewith  submitted.  The  areas  are  all  estimated  on  the 
basis  of  the  "  eighteen  foot  pole."  The  records,  however,  show  that  some  of  the 
lots  were  of  larger  dimensions,  and  that  others  fell  short  of  the  required  amount 
and  were  supplemented  by  additional  grants  of  land. 

In  addition  to  the  home  lots,  each  proprietor  had  a  six  acre  lot  at  a  distance 
from  his  home  lot,  and  also  "  stated  common  lots,"  either  purchased  or  acquired  by 
occasional  dividends  among  themselves.  Each  settler's  share,  therefore,  comprised 
the  home  lots,  the  upland  for  planting,  the  meadow,  consisting  of  salt  marsh  or 
bog,  whereon  was  cut  the  winter  fodder  for  the  cattle,  and  the  woodland. 

In  a  short  time  the  number  of  inhabitants  was  considerably  increased  by 
accessions  from  the  neighboring  colonies,  and  a  form  of  government  was  adopted 
which  is  embodied  in  the  following  agreement,  there  being  no  date  appended  to  it 
in  the  original  record : 


SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE.  jr 


"  We  whose  names  are  hereunder  desirous  to  inhabit  in  the  town  of  Provi- 
dence, do  promise  to  subject  ourselves  in  active  and  passive  obedience,  to  all  such 
orders  or  agreements  as  shall  be  made  for  public  good  of  the  body,  in  an  orderly 
way,  by  the  major  consent  of  the  present  inhabitants,  masters  of  families,  incorpo- 
rated together  into  a  town  fellowship,  and  others  whom  they  shall  admit  unto  them, 
only  in  civil  things. 

Richard  Scott,  Edward  Cope, 

William  X   Renolds  Thomas  X  Angell, 

Chad  Browne  Thomas  X   Harris, 

John  Warner  Francis  X  Weekes, 

John  X  Feild  Benedict  Arnold 

George  Rickard  Joshua  Winsor 

William  Wickenden."i 

The  compact  of  July  27,  1640,  consisted  of  a  report  prepared  by  Robert  Cole, 
Chad  Brown,  William  Harris  and  John  Warner,  who  had  been  "  freely  chosen  "  by 
their  "  loving  friends  and  neighbors  "  to  settle  the  "  many  differences  "  which  had 
arisen  among  them.  The  report  of  these  arbiters,  containing  proposals  for  a  form 
of  government,  was  signed  by  thirty-nine  inhabitants  of  the  town,  and  is  note- 
worthy as  having  been  the  first  departure  from  a  pure  democracy  and  the  begin- 
ning of  a  town  organization. 

The  following  extracts  from  this  compact  are  taken  from  "  Staples'  Annals  of 
Providence,"  pp.  41-43 : 

Article  second : 

"Agreed.  We  have  with  one  consent  agreed,  that  for  the  disposing  those 
lands  that  shall  be  disposed,  belonging  to  this  town  of  Providence,  to  be  in  the 
whole  inhabitants  by  the  choice  of  five  men  for  general  disposal,  to  be  betrusted 
with  disposal  of  lands  and  also  of  the  town's  stock  and  all  general  things,  and 
not  to  receive  in  any  in  six  days,  as  townsmen,  but  first  to  give  the  inhabitants 

I.    Deeds,  &c.,  Trans,,  p.  i. 


1 6  ROGER     WILLIAMS    AND     THE 

notice,  to  consider  if  any  have  just  cause  to  show  against  the  receiving  of  him, 
as  you  can  apprehend,  and  to  receive  none  but  such  as  subscribe  to  this  our 
determination.  Also  we  agree,  that  if  any  of  our  neighbors  do  apprehend  himself 
wronged  by  these  or  any  of  these  five  disposers,  that  at  the  general  town  meeting 
he  may  have  a  trial. 

"  Also,  we  agree  for  the  town  to  choose  beside  the  other  five  men,  one  to  keep 
record  of  all  things  belonging  to  the  town  and  lying  in  common. 

"  We  agree,  as  formerly  hath  been  the  liberties  of  the  town,  so  still  to  hold 
forth,  liberty  of  conscience." 

Article  seven : 

"Agreed,  that  the  town  by  five  men  shall  give  every  man  a  deed  of «all  his 
lands  lying  within  the  bounds  of  the  plantation  to  hold  it  by  for  after  ages." 

Article  twelve : 

"  Agreed,  that  every  man  who  hath  not  paid  in  his.  purchase  money  for  his 
plantation  shall  make  up  his  lo^-.  to  be  30^".  equal  with  the  first  purchasers,  and 
for  all  that  are  received  as  townsmen  hereafter,  to  pay  the  like  sum  of  money  to 
the  town  stock." 

Roger  Williams  having  effected  a  settlement  at  Providence,  as  we  have  seen, 
devoted  the  remaining  years  of  his  life  to  the  welfare  of  the  colony  he  had  planted, 
and  to  the  various  duties,  public  and  private,  which  devolved  upon  him  as  its  father 
and  founder. 

In  1643  hs  sailed  for  England  as  an  agent  for  the  colonies  of  Providence, 
Rhode  Island  and  Warwick,  and  obtained  a  charter  of  incorporation,  signed  by  the 
Earl  of  Warwick,  Governor  and  Admiral  of  the  English  Plantations,  and  by 
his  Council.  While  there  he  published  his  "  Key  into  the  Language  of  America," 
which  he  had  prepared  during  the  voyage. 

In  1 65 1  he  visited  England  a  second  time,  in  company  with  Rev.  John  Clarke, 
on  matters  of  great  public  interest,  and  successfully  accomplished  the  mission. 


SETTLEMENT    AT    PROVIDENCE. 


17 


While  in  England  he  was  the  guest  of  Sir  Henry  Vane,  at  his  residence  in 
Lincolnshire,  where  he  enjoyed  the  acquaintance  of  Cromwell,  Milton  and  other 
leading  spirits  of  the  age.  He  returned  to  Providence  in  1654,  and  on  the  12th 
of  September  of  that  year  he  was  chosen  President  of  the  colony,  which  office  he 
held  until  May,  1658.  He  travelled  much  among  the  Indians  and  preached  to 
them,  securing  the  friendship  of  the  chiefs  and  the  warriors,  which  he  retained  to 
his  latest  days. 

Roger  Williams  died  sometime  between  January  16,  1682-3,^  and  April  25, 
1683,^  at  about  the  age  of  83  years,  and  "was  buried  with  all  the  solemnity  the 
colony  was  able  to  show."  His  remains  were  deposited  in  his  own  family  burying- 
ground  on  his  home  lot,  a  short  distance  only  from  the  place  where  his  dwelling 
housft  stood. 

The  home  lot  of  Roger  Williams  was  located  on  the  hillside  easterly  from  the 
spring  where  he  first  landed,  and  immediately  north  of  Bowen  street.  His  house 
occupied  very  nearly  the  site  of  the  present  building  on  the  northeast  corner  of 
North  Main  and  Howland  streets. 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  Roger  Williams,  fronting  on  North  Main 
street,  is  now  in  the  possession  of  the  heirs  of  Humphrey  Almy,  Matilda  Metcalf 
and  Harriet  T.  Richmond. 


1.  Roger  Williams'  signature  is  affixed  to  a  document  bearing  this  date,  concerning  the  Pawtuxet  lands, 

2.  On  this  date  William  Carpenter  signed  an  instrument  in  which  he  states  he  was  the  last  survivor  of  the 
thirteen  original  proprietors. 


THE   HOME   LOTS. 


THE  following  is  a  list  of  the  homesteads  of  the  early  settlers  of  the  Planta- 
tions founded  by  Roger  Williams,  commencing  at  Dexter's  lane,  now  Olney 
street,   and   extending   to   "  Mile-End   Cove,"  or   Wickenden   street.      This 
arrangement  conforms  more  nearly  to  the  order  of  settlement  than  that  presented 
in  the  original  list,  reproduced  in  the  appendix. 

It  is  believed  that  the  accompanying  notes,  and  extracts  from  the  town  records, 
will  be  of  interest  and  value  not  only  to  the  numerous  descendants  so  largely  rep- 
resented in  the  State  of  Rhode  Island,  but  to  the  community  at  large,  owing  to  the 
fact  that  the  present  titles  to  these  estates  are  founded  upon  the  original  records 
here  presented : 

Gregory  Dexter  is  said  to  have  been  born  in  London,  where  he  followed 
the  business  of  printing.  His  imprint  appears  on  the  title-page  of  Roger 
Williams'  volume,  "A  Key  into  the  Language  of  America,"  published  in  London 
in  1643.  He  came  to  Providence  about  1644,  and  was  soon  after  received  into  the 
Baptist  Church,  of  which  he  afterwards  (about  1650)  became  pastor.  He  was  also 
active  in  the  civil  affairs  of  the  colony.  His  name  is  affixed  to  the  compact  of 
July  27,  1640.  He  was  elected  to  the  office  of  Town  Clerk  for  a  number  of  years, 
was  chosen  Commissioner  to  represent  the  town  in  the  General  Assembly  and 
served  as   President  of    Providence   and  Warwick  in  1653-4.     ^^    1^54  ^^  was 


20  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

appointed  with  Roger  Williams  to  write  letters  to  Cromwell,  Sir  Henry  Vane 
and  others.  Roger  Williams  speaks  of  him  as  "  a  man  of  education  and  of  a  noble 
calling  and  versed  in  militaries." 

Morgan  Edwards  says  of  him :  "  Mr.  Dexter  by  all  accounts  was  not  only 
a  well-bred  man,  but  remarkably  pious.  He  was  never  observed  to  laugh,  seldom 
to  smile.  So  earnest  was  he  in  his  ministry  that  he  could  hardly  forbear  preach- 
ing when  he  came  into  a  house  or  met  with  a  concourse  of  people  out  of  doors." 

His  home  lot  was  the  most  northerly  of  the  fifty-two  lots  of  the  first  division, 
and  was  bounded  on  the  north  by  Dexter's  lane,  now  Olney  street.  The  home  lot 
adjoining  his  on  the  south  (Mathew  Waller's)  came  into  his  possession  as  early  as 
October  19,  1663.  These  two  home  lots  of  Gregory  Dexter's  are  described  as 
*'  a  parcel  of  land  .  .  .  about  ten  acres  &  is  two  house  lots  .  .  .  adjoining 
each  to  the  other  and  bounding  on  the  North  part  with  a  highway  &  on  the  East 
part  with  a  highway,  on  the  West  part  with  the  town  street  and  on  the  South  part 
with  the  land  of  Edward  Manton."^ 

June  4,  1696 : 

"  I,  Gregory  Dexter  ...  do  hereby  freely  give  .  .  .  unto  my  Grand  son 
Peleg  Dexter  a  house  lot  .  .  .  containing  five  acres  &  part  planted  with  apple 
trees  &  bounded  on  the  west  by  the  streete  way  &  on  the  north  by  a  highway, 
&  on  the  East  by  a  highway  &  on  the  south  by  a  Lott  that  I  gave  to  my  grand 
daughter  Isabel."^ 

The  western  part  of  Gregory  Dexter's  home  lot  is  now  in  the  possession  of 
Mary  R.  Peckham,  Emery  H.  Calder  and  Mrs.  William  H.  Calder. 

Mathew  Waller  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  His  name  also  appears  on 
the  roll  of  freemen  in  Providence,  1655.  His  home  lot  became  the  property  of 
Gregory  Dexter,  as  appears  by  the  record  of  the  sale  of  the  home  lot  (Thomas 
Painter's)  *'  formerly  Pardon  Tillinghast's     ...     5  acres,  bounded  on  the  south 

I.    Trans.,  p.  336.  2.    Deeds  I,  p.  231. 


LANE 


DETXTER 


WALLER. 


PAINTOR; 


MANTON. 


A.L.BOOWELL.   PHOTO     ENG.    PROV     R  .  i 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS,  21 

by  the  home  lot  of  Edward  Manton,  on  the  north  by  land  "  now  in  possession  of 
Gregory  Dexter."^  This  home  lot  of  Mathew  Waller's  was  given  by  Gregory 
Dexter  to  his  grand-daughter  Isabel.^  The  west  end  of  this  home  lot  is  now  owned 
by  Morris  Deming  and  Thomas  D.  Deming. 

Thomas  Painter  had  lot  assigned  him  on  the  "  Towne  Streete."  In  1655 
his  name  appears  on  the  roll  of  freemen  of  Newport.  The  home  lot  of  Thomas 
Painter  became  the  property  of  the  town,  and  was  assigned  to  Pardon  Tillinghast, 
as  appears  from  the  following  extract  from  the  town  records : 

April  2,  1669 : 

"  I  Henry  Browne  .  .  .  have  sold  .  .  .  unto  Shadrac  Manton  .  .  . 
a  house  lot  or  home  share  of  land  with  the  dwelling  house  .  .  .  which  is  upon 
the  said  lot  .  .  .  five  acres  more  or  less  and  is  bounding  on  the  south  with  the 
home  lot  of  Edward  Manton  ...  on  the  north  with  the  land  now  in  the 
possession  of  Gregory  Dexter  ...  on  the  west  or  front  with  a  fence  .  .  . 
and  is  in  breadth  seven  poles  ...  I  Henry  Browne  bought  it  of  John 
ffenner  .  .  .  he  .  .  .  bought  the  said  lot  with  the  housing  upon  it  of 
Pardon  Tillinghast  .  .  .  the  said  lot  Pardon  Tillinghast  received  of  the  Town 
of  Providence,  being  received  into  the  Town  according  to  their  Order  of  a  five 
and  twenty  acre  right."^ 

February  26,  1668: 

"  Voted  and  ordered,  that  Henry  Browne  his  house  and  lot  which  he  bought 
of  John  Fenner  shall  be  made  up  full  five  Acres.  .  .  .  The  said  Henry  Browne's 
lot  is  bounded  on  the  South  with  the  lot  of  Edward  Manton  and  on  the  North 
with  a  lot  belonging  unto  Gregory  Dexter."* 

A  part  of  the  west  end  of  the  home  lot  of  Thomas  Painter  is  now  the  property 
of  Josiah  W.  Crooker. 

Edward  Manton  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 
January  27,  1667,  Edward  Manton's  "  house  lot  or  home  share  whereon  his  house 

I.     Trans.,  p.  273.  2.     Deeds  I,  p.  231.  3.     Trans.,  p.  279.  4.     Trans.,  p.  211. 

4 


22  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

standeth  "  is  described  as  being  bounded  "  on  the  north  side  with  the  lot  of  Henry- 
Brown,  south  side  bounding  with  a  lot  now  belonging  to  John  Whipple,  Sen.  .  .  .  "i 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  Edward  Manton,  fronting  on  Benefit  street, 
is  now  the  property  of  the  City  of  Providence  and  is  occupied  by  a  school  house. 

John  Greene,  Jr.,  "  Deputy  Governor,"  was  born  in  the  year  1620.  In 
1642  his  name  appears  as  a  witness  to  the  purchase  of  Shawomet.  He  was  elected 
Commissioner  from  Warwick  from  165 1  to  1659,  when  he  was  elected  Assistant, 
and,  with  the  exception  of  two  years,  was  re-elected  to  this  office  for  a  period  of 
twenty-six  years.  He  also  served  as  Attorney  General  for  a  number  of  years,  and 
in  1654,  and  again  in  1664  was  appointed  on  a  committee  to  revise  the  public  laws. 
He  served  as  Deputy  Governor  from  1690  to  1700,  and  died  in  Warwick,  Novem- 
ber 27,  1708. 

The  house  in  which  he  resided  in  Warwick  is  still  standing  in  an  excellent 
state  of  preservation,  located  on  his  homestead,  now  known  as  Spring  Green  Farm. 

His  home  lot  was  in  the  possession  of  John  Whipple,  Sr.,  January  27,  1667. 
The  western  part  of  his  home  lot,  fronting  on  Benefit  street,  is  now  owned  by 
Henry  J.  Steere  and  Allen  Greene. 

Benedict  Arnold,  son  of  William,  was  born  in  England,  December  21, 
161 5,  and  came  to  Providence  in  1636.  He  received  a  grant  of  land  and  signed 
the  first  agreement,  also  the  compact  of  1640.  He  removed  to  Pawtuxet  with  his 
father,  and  in  1653  became  a  resident  of  Newport  and  was  chosen  Assistant.  In 
1658  he  succeeded  Mr.  Williams  as  Governor,  and  continued  in  that  office  until 
1660;  also  from  1662  to  1666,  from  1669  to  1672,  and  from  1677  to  1678,  in  which 
last  year  he  died.  He  was  reputed  to  be  the  wealthiest  man  in  the  colony,  and, 
excepting  Roger  Williams,  was  probably  the  most  proficient  in  the  language  of  the 
Indians. 

The  western  part  of  his  home  lot,  fronting  on  Benefit  street,  is  now  in  the 
possession  of  Allen  Greene  and  John  Metcalf. 

I.     Trans.,  p.  202. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  23 


Francis  Wickes  was  one  of  the  five  who  accompanied  Roger  Williams  on 
his  first  landing  at  Providence.  He  is  supposed  to  have  been  a  minor,  as  his  name 
does  not  appear  in  the  original  deed  from  Williams.  He  received  a  home  lot  and 
signed  the  first  agreement  and  the  compact  of  1640.  His  home  lot  became  the 
property  of  John  Whipple  as  early  as  November  23,  1663,  as  appears  by  the 
following  extract  from  the  town  records :  "  On  the  north  side  with  a  home  share 
of  land  which  formerly  belonged  unto  Francis  Wickes,  but  now  in  the  possession 
of  me,  John  Whipple."^ 

The  old  "  Whipple  Tavern  "  was  located  on  the  "  Towne  Streete,"  within  the 
limits  of  Francis  Wickes'  home  lot,  and  occupied  the  site  of  369  North  Main 
street. 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  Francis  Wickes,  fronting  on  Benefit 
street,  is  a  part  of  the  John  Carter  Brown  and  Ebenezer  Kelley  estates. 

William  Arnold,  with  his  family,  "Sett  sayle  ffrom  Dartmouth  in  old 
England,  the  first  of  May,  1635,"  and  arrived  in  New  England,  June  24th  following. 
After  residing  a  short  time  in  Hingham,  Mass.,  he  removed  with  his  family,  in  1636, 
to  Providence.  He  was  one  of  the  original  proprietors  of  Providence,  the  second 
named  in  the  initial  deed,  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  In  1638  he  removed 
to  Pawtuxet,  and  in  1642,  with  others,  placed  himself  under  the  jurisdiction 
of  Massachusetts.  In  1658  the  General  Court  of  Massachusetts,  at  their  request, 
gave  the  Pawtuxet  settlers  permission  to  withdraw  their  allegiance  from  that 
colony. 

"14^*  2^  Mo.  [April]   1 64 1. 

"  The  Town  of  Providence  have  appropriated  to  William  Arnold  his  house 
share  which  containeth  in  length  on  the  south  part  five  score  and  twelve  poles  .  .  . 
and  in  breadth  on  the  west  part  eight  poles  and  on  the  east  part  eight  poles  .  .  . 
the  poles  being  sixteen  feet  and  one  half    .    .    .    bounded  with  the  home  share  of 

I.    Trans.,  p.  193. 


24 


THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


Francis  Wickes  on  the  north  part,  and  the  house  and  lands  that  is  now  in  the 
hands  and  occupation  of  Wm.  Field  on  the  south  part,  and  the  street  on  the 
west  part,  and  a  swamp  on  the  east  part.  .  .  .  And  Also,  another  plat  of 
ground  lying  without  the  north  end  of  the  town,  upon  part  of  which  the  said 
Wm.  Arnold  hath  set  up  a  Wolf  trap."* 

November  23,  1663: 

"  I,  John  Whipple  of  Providence  have  freely  given  unto  my  son  John  Whipple 
a  house  lot  or  home  share  of  land  which  formerly  belonged  unto  Wm.  Arnold  (now 
inhabitant  of  Pawtuxet,)  with  all  the  housing,  fencing,  fruit  trees  standing  upon  the 
said  land  .  .  .  only  excepting  so  much  of  the  East  part  of  the  said  lot  which 
belongeth  unto  Thomas  Olney  of  Prov.  (Senior)  which  is  about  two  acres.  .  .  . 
The  said  share  of  land  is  in  the  Row  of  house  lots  in  Providence  .  .  .  Bound- 
ing East  with  Thomas  Olney  .  .  .  West  with  the  street  .  .  .  On  the 
north  side  with  a  home  share  of  land  which  formerly  belonged  unto  Francis 
Wickes  .  .  .  but  now  in  the  possession  of  me,  John  Whipple  ...  on  the 
south  side  with  a  home  share  of  land  formerly  belonging  unto  Thomas  James 
formerly  inhabitant  of  Providence  .  .  .  but  now  in  the  possession  of  John 
Throckmorton.  .  .  .  The  aforesaid  lot  or  share  of  land  containeth  in  breadth 
eight  poles     .    .    .    sixteen  feet  and  a  half  to  the  pole."2 

John  Whipple,  Jr.,  having  died  December  15,  1700,  his  heirs,  on  the  2 2d  day 
of  April,  1 70 1,  in  dividing  the  estate,  gave  the  homestead  lot,  on  which  he  lived, 
originally  the  home  lot  of  William  Arnold,  to  his  son  John  Whipple,  and  also  one- 
half  of  the  adjoining  home  lot  on  the  south  (the  home  lot  of  Thomas  James), 
purchased  by  John  Whipple,  Jr.,  of  Alexander  Bryant,  it  having  formerly  belonged 
to  John  Throckmorton.  "  The  which  half  of  said  lot  shall  be  that  half  of  it 
all  the  length  from  the  Towne  Streete  to  the  east  end  of  said  lot  which  is  the 
northern  half,  and  adjoineth  to  that  lot  whereon  the  said  John  Whipple's  housing 
stands."^ 

I.    Trans.,  p.  67.  2.    Trans.,  p.  193.  3.    Prov.  Records,  Old  Book,  No.  II,  p.  307. 


p^j^H  swo^^^g  *^^^^voXimate 


locatioiv  of  IToME  Lots  of  the 

Early  Settlers  o^  Providence,II.I 


Copyright  bv  C.W.Hopkins. 
ISS6. 


CANAL 


A.L.BcuwELL.  Photo  ENc,  PhdV.  R.L 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  25 


"July  27,  1659,   Quarter  Day. 

"  This  day  John  Whipple.  Senr.  is  received  into  the  Town  a  purchaser  to  have 
a  purchase  right  of  lands."^ 

Extract  from  the  will  of  John  Whipple,  Sr.,  dated  May  8,  1682 : 

"  I  give  unto  my  son  Joseph  my  dwelling  house  &  my  three  home  lotts  &  ye 
Garden  next  ye  River." 

Date  of  the  probate  of  the  will,  May  27,  1685.* 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Arnold,  fronting  on  Benefit 
street,  is  now  in  the  possession  of  Mrs.  Sarah  J.  S.  Durfee,  wife  of  Chief  Justice 
Thomas  Durfee. 


Thomas  James,  an  ordained  minister,  was  the  third  named  in  the  initial 
deed  of  Roger  Williams  to  his  twelve  associates.  He  received  a  grant  of  land  in 
Providence,  June  10,  [1637,]  and  was  also  one  of  the  Pawtuxet  purchasers.  He 
sold  his  home  lot  to  William  Field,  March  20,  1639,  and  it  subsequently  became 
the  property  of  John  Throckmorton,  who  was  the  owner  November  23,  1663; 
Alexander  Bryant  and  John  Whipple,  successively. 

The  western  part  of  his  home  lot,  fronting  on  Benefit  street,  is  now  in  the 
possession  of  Mrs.  Sarah  J.  S.  Durfee,  wife  of  Chief  Justice  Thomas  Durfee. 


John  Greene,  Sr.,  who  was  educated  a  surgeon,  and  had  practiced  in 
Salisbury,  England,  was  the  son  of  Richard  and  Mary  (Hooker)  Greene,  of  Bow- 
ridge  Hill,  Parish  of  Gillingham,  Dorsetshire,  England.  He  came  from  Hampton 
in  the  James  of  London,  April  6,  1635,  accompanied  by  his  wife  and  five  children. 
His  first  wife,  Joan  Tattersall,  the  mother  of  his  six  children,  died  at  Conanicut  in 
1643,  having  fled  to  that  island  for  safety  at  the  time  the  Massachusetts  troops 

I.    Trans.,  p.  105.  2.    Wills  II,  p.  80. 


26  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

made  their  unjustifiable  and  cruel  assault  upon  the  inhabitants  of  Warwick.  His 
second  wife  was  Alice  Daniels,  a  widow,  who  had  received  a  home  lot  in  Providence. 
His  third  wife  was  Philip  or  Philippa,  who  survived  him. 

John  Greene,  Sr.,  was  one  of  the  thirteen  original  proprietors  of  Providence, 
the  fifth  named  in  the  initial  deed.  October,  1642,  he  purchased  of  Myantonomi 
the  tract  of  land  Occupasnatuxet,  now  known  as  the  Spring  Green  Farm,  in 
Warwick.  January  12,  1642-3,  he,  with  others,  purchased  Shawomet,  or  Warwick, 
of  Myantonomi.  August  8,  1643,  he  was  a  member  of  the  first  town  council  of 
Warwick,  and  in  1652  and  1653  served  as  General  Recorder.  He  was  prominent 
in  the  colonial  affairs  of  Providence  and  Warwick,  and  the  loss  of  his  professional 
services  upon  his  removal  to  Warwick  must  have  been  keenly  felt  by  the  people  of 
Providence.  He  was  the  ancestor  of  General  Nathanael  Greene  and  of  others  who 
have  borne  a  prominent  part  in  the  history  of  the  State  and  nation. 

John  Greene,  Sr.,  "On  the  25  September,  1644  sold  his  interest  in  the 
Providence  purchase  to  his  son  John.  At  that  time  he  was  residing  at  Occupassua- 
tuxet,  in  Warwick.  The  General  Court  of  Massachusetts,  in  October,  1658, 
granted  him  leave  to  visit  his  friends  there,  for  one  month,  '  sometime  in  the  next 
summer,  he  behaving  himself  peaceably  and  inoffensively.'  .  .  .  John  Greene 
was  prevented  by  death  from  availing  himself  of  this  liberty.  He  died  in  the 
winter  of  1658.     .     .     ."^ 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  John  Greene,  Senior,  fronting  on  North 
Main  street,  is  now  in  the  possession  of  Mrs.  Raymond  G.  Hodges,  Mary  K. 
Newell  and  Mrs.  George  B.  Calder. 


John  Smith  (the  miller)  came  to  Providence  in  1636.  Roger  Williams, 
before  the  Court  of  Commissioners,  said,  "  I  consented  to  John  Smith,  miller  at 
Dorchester,  (banished  also)  to  go  with  me." 

I.    Collections  of  the  Rhode  Island  Historical  Society,  Vol.  2,  p.  89. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  27 


"  i^'  of  the   i^*  mo.  [March]   1646  so  called. 

"  It  was  agreed  that  John  Smith  have  the  valley  wherein  his  house  stands  in 
case  he  set  up  a  mill."  The  offer  was  accepted  and  the  mill  built.  He  died 
between  1647  and  the  loth  of  May,  1649. 

April  30,  1 71 3,  the  home  lot  originally  assigned  to  John  Smith,  miller,  was 
in  the  possession  of  the  heirs  of  Major  John  Dexter,  deceased.^  The  present 
owners  of  the  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  the  above  John  Smith  are  Sophia 
Daniels,  George  J.  Thurber,  Newton  C.  Dana,  and  Mary  T.  Rivers. 

Widow  Reeve  had  been  a  member  of  the  church  at  Salem,  and  upon 
removing  to  Providence  received  a  home  lot  in  the  first  division  of  lands.  This 
home  lot  came  into  the  possession  of  Richard  Scott,  and  was  by  John  Scott  sold 
to  Charles  Dier,^who  sold  it  April  30,  171 3,  together  with  the  home  lot  adjoining  it 
on  the  south  (the  home  lot  of  Joshua  Verin),  to  Nathaniel  Brown,^  The  western 
part  of  this  lot  was  occupied  by  "  The  Church  of  England,"  or  "  King's  Church,"  as 
it  was  called,  as  early  as  1722,  it  having  been  transferred  to  the  church  by  deeds  of 
gift  from  Nathaniel  Brown,  dated  September  18  and  19,  1722.^  (See  Joshua  Verin.) 
The  origin  of  this  church  is  due  in  a  great  measure  "  to  the  persevering  piety  and 
untiring  zeal  of  Gabriel  Bernon,"  one  of  its  first  Wardens,  who  is  buried  beneath 
the  church,  and  in  whose  memory  a  mural  tablet  has  been  erected.  This  edifice 
received  the  name  of  St.  John's  Church  by  act  of  incorporation  1794.  The  corner- 
stone of  the  present  church,  occupying  the  same  site,  was  laid  Tuesday,  June  5, 
1 8 10,  the  old  church  having  been  demolished  in  April  of  that  year. 

Joshua  Verin  was  one  of  the  five  who  accompanied  Roger  Williams  on  his 
first  visit  to  Providence,  and  received  an  early  grant  of  land. 

May  2ist,  second  year  of  the  Plantation,  it  was  ordered  that  "Joshua  Verin,  for 
breach  of  covenant  in  restraining  liberty  of  conscience,  shall  be  withheld  the  liberty 

I.  Deeds  II,  p.  300.     2.  Deeds  II,  p.  347.     3.  Deeds  II,  p.  300.     4.  Deeds  V,  p.  190-192. 


28  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

of  voting,  till  he  declare  the  contrary."  He  had  restrained  his  wife  from  attending 
religious  meetings  as  often  as  she  desired.  He  removed  to  Salem,  and  November 
21,  1650,  sent  a  letter  to  the  town  of  Providence  claiming  a  right  to  land  as  one 
of  the  six  original  proprietors.  An  answer  was  returned  that  justice  would  be  done 
him  should  he  come  into  court  and  prove  his  right. 

January  28,  1674-5 : 

"  Laid  out  unto  John  Whipple  Jun.  Atturney  unto  Joshua  Verin  in  ye  right 
of  the  said  Verin  now  of  Barbadoes  in  Saint  James  parrish,  formerly  an  inhabitant 
of  this  town — four  score  and  fourteen  acres  of  land  being  part  of  his  purchase 
right  in  ye  first  division,  (the  other  part  being  his  house  lot  and  one  share  of  salt 
meadow  which  he  sold  unto  Mr.  Richard  Scott  of  said  Towne)."^ 

"  Samuell  Whipple  of  Providence  being  of  full  age  testifyeth  &  saith  that  his 
Brother  John  Whipple  he  Vnderstood  had  A  Letter  of  Aturney  from  Joshua  Verin 
to  Challinge  his  whole  wright  &  he  sd  Whipple  being  Consairned  About  it  this 
deponant  asked  Richard  Scott  of  sd  towne  wether  he  had  bought  his  home  lote  & 
his  share  of  salt  medow  &  furder  this  deponant  saith  that  said  Scott  said  that  he 
thought  he  had  bought  all  sd  Verin's  Right  in  providence  but  upon  search  of  his 
deed  he  found  he  had  bought  no  more  than  his  hows  Lote  and  his  medow  and 
claimed  no  more  than  his  deed  mentioned. 

taken  or  ingaged  this  28th  of  May  1705. 

Joseph  Williams 

Assistant."2 

April  30,  1 71 3: 

"  Charles  Dire  of  Providence  .  .  .  for  and  in  consideration  of  the  sum  of 
Three  Hundred  Pounds  of  Current  Money  sold  unto  Nathaniel  Brown  of  Reho- 
both,  Shipwright  .  .  .  certain  lands,  meadows  &  Privileges  ...  in  Provi- 
dence aforesaid  the  which  formerly  belonged  to  Richard  Scott  of  said  Providence, 
deceased  as  namely  two   Home  lots    lieing  in   the   Towne   being   in    Estimation 

1.  Deeds  I,  p.  59. 

2.  The  author  is  indebted  to  Mr.  Fred.  A.  Arnold,  of  Providence,  for  this  transcript  from  the  Foster  Papers, 
No.  13,  p.  14,  and  for  other  similar  favors. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  29 


thirteen  acres  &  are  bounded  on  the  south  with  the  lot  belonging  to  the  Heirs  of 
Daniel  Williams  (deceased)  &  on  the  north  with  land  belonging  to  the  Heirs  of 
Major  John  Dexter  (deceased)  &  on  the  East  with  a  Highway  &  on  the  west 
with  the  Towne  street  .  .  .  and  also  all  other  lands  of  what  sort  soever  either 
devided  or  undevided  which  formally  belonged  to  ye  said  deceased  Richard  Scott 
of  sd  Providence  ;  that  is  to  say,  all  those  that  I  bought  of  Mr.  John  Scot  of  New- 
port in  the  Colony  aforesaid  and  was  not  before  disposed  of."^ 

The  two  home  lots  sold  as  above  were  originally  the  home  lots  of  Widow 
Reeve  and  Joshua  Verin,  and  are  believed  to  have  been  occupied  at  a  later  period 
as  the  residence  of  Richard  Scott,  and  also  of  William  and  Mary  Dyer.  It  was 
from  her  home  at  this  place  that  Mary  Dyer  is  said  to  have  gone  forth  to  suffer 
martyrdom  at  Boston  as  a  preacher  of  the  Society  of  Friends. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Joshua  Verin  is  now  in  the  possession 
of  the  heirs  of  Joseph  Fletcher  and  Mrs.  James  Snow,  Jr. 

Roger  Williams.     (See  pages  i  to  17.) 

John  Throckmorton  sailed  from  Bristol,  England,  December  i,  1630,  in 
company  with  Roger  Williams.  "  He  had  been  an  officer  of  an  English  corpora- 
tion and  had  some  acquaintance  with  law."  He  and  his  wife  were  members  of  the 
church  at  Salem,  and  later  became  original  members,  of  the  church  at  Providence. 
He  was  the  sixth  named  in  the  initial  deed.  He  signed  the  compact  of  1640,  and 
was  appointed  Deputy  for  the  years  1664,  '65  and  '66.  In  1667  he  was  exonerated 
from  the  charge  made  against  him  and  others  by  William  Harris.  He  became  one 
of  the  earliest  of  Fox's  converts. 

The  home  lot  of  John  Throckmorton  was  in  the  possession  of  Samuel  Right, 
January  4,  1 704-5  .^ 

The  western  front  of  his  home  lot  is  now  in  the  possession  of  William  Ames, 
trustee,  and  Anna  O.  Greene. 

I.    Deeds  II,  p.  300.  3.     Deeds  III,  p.  53. 


30  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


William  Harris  "arrived  at  Salem  in  1635."  He  removed  to  Providence 
with  Williams  and  became  one  of  the  original  proprietors,  the  seventh  named  in 
the  initial  deed,  and  was  one  of  the  four  proprietors  of  the  Pawtuxet  purchase  who 
placed  themselves  under  the  jurisdiction  of  Massachusetts.  He  was  one  of  the 
four  arbiters  appointed  to  prepare  a  plan  of  government  in  1640,  one  of  the  two 
town  magistrates  of  Providence  in  1655,  and  a  Commissioner  to  represent  the  town 
of  Providence  in  1657-58-62-63.  "  Harris  and  Olney  were  the  first  surveyors  of 
Providence."     "  Harris  had  probably  been  an  attorney  or  attorney's  clerk." 

In  1667  he  was  deposed  from  his  office  of  Assistant  and  a  fine  of  ;^50  was 
imposed  by  the  General  Assembly  for  his  procuring  the  Assembly  to  be  called 
without  sufficient  cause.     The  fine  was  subsequently  remitted. 

He  was  bitterly  opposed  to  Roger  Williams  in  matters  pertaining  to  the  pro- 
prietorship of  the  lands. 

"On  the  24th  of  January,  1679,  he  sailed  for  England  on  board  of  the  ship 
Unity  of  Boston,  William  Condy,  master,  as  agent  of  the  Pawtuxet  purchasers. 
In  the  course  of  this  voyage  he  was  taken  by  a  Barbary  corsair  and  carried  to 
Algiers,  where  he  remained  in  captivity  more  than  a  year.  He  was  redeemed  at 
the  cost  of  about  $1200,  travelled  through  Spain  and  France,  and  arrived  in 
London  in  1680,  and  died  the  third  day  after  his  arrival  at  the  house  of  his  friend, 
John  Sailes.  He  executed  his  will  at  Newport  before  he  sailed  for  England.  That 
is  dated  Dec.  4,  1678.  .  .  .  It  was  afterwards  proved  at  Providence,  Feb.  20, 
i682."i 

The  home  lot  of  William  Harris  became  the  property  of  Daniel  Brown,  who  sold 
it  to  Daniel  Williams,  as  appears  by  the  following  extract  from  the  town  records : 

January  4,  1 704-5  : 

"  I,  Daniel  Brown  .  .  .  have  sold  .  .  .  one  house  lot  in  Providence 
Joyning  to  the  house  lot  of  Samuel  Right  now  in  possession  on  the  north  and 
on  the  south  to  a  Lott  that  was  formerly  Valentine  Whitmans  ...  to  Daniel 
Williams."2 

I.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'7,  Vol.  2,  p.  113.  2.    Deeds  III,  p.  53. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  31 


The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Harris  is  now  owned  by  Albert 
D.  Yeomans,  Martha  A.  Yeomans,  and  Albert  L.  Calder. 

Alice  Daniels  received  a  grant  of  land  the  second  year  of  the  Plantation. 
She  married  John  Greene,  Sr.,  and  her  home  lot  was  sold  to  Valentine  Whitman, 
as  appears  from  the  following  extract  from  the  town  records : 

"  Nov.  27,  1657.  .  .  .  John  Greene  Sen.  sold  to  Valentine  Whitman  a 
house  lot  lying  between  the  lot  of  William  Harris  on  the  north  and  Edward 
Manton  on  the  south."^ 

March  6,  1685: 

"  I,  Valentine  Whitman  ...  for  a  valuable  sum  of  silver  money  in 
hand  .  .  .  paid  by  Daniel  Williams  .  .  .  have  sold  .  .  .  my  House 
and  House  Lott  .  .  .  bounding  on  the  northern  side  with  a  home  share  of 
Land  now  in  the  possession  of  the  said  Daniel  Williams  the  which  belonged  unto 
William  Harris  of  said  Providence,  now  deceased  and  on  the  southern  side  with  a 
home  share  of  land  now  in  the  possession  of  Shadrac  Manton  .  .  .  containing 
by  estimation  about  seven  acres."^ 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Alice  Daniels  is  now  in  the  possession 
of  Thomas  Furlong. 

John  Sweet  received  a  home  lot  in  the  first  division  of  lands  at  Providence. 
He  removed  to  Warwick,  and  was  chosen  Commissioner  in  1653. 

His  home  lot  became  the  property  of  Edward  Manton,  as  appears  from  the 
following  extract  from  the  town  record : 

*'  Nov.  27,  1657: 

"  John  Greene  Sen.  sold  to  Valentine  Whitman  a  house  lot  lying  between  the 
lot  of  Wm.  Harris  on  the  north  and  Edward  Manton  on  the  south. "^ 

This  home  lot  was  owned  by  Shadrac  Manton,  March  6,  1685.  The  western 
part  of  this  lot  is  now  occupied  by  the  State  House. 

I.     Trans.,  p.  80.  2.     Deeds  IX,  p.  365.  3.     Trans.,  p.  80. 


32  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


William  Carpenter,  son  of  Richard,  of  Amesbury,  Wiltshire,  England, 
came  to  Providence  in  1636.  He  was  one  of  the  original  proprietors,  the  eighth 
named  in  the  initial  deed,  and  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 

In  1642  he,  with  his  father-in-law,  William  Arnold,  and  two  others,  subjected 
himself  to  the  jurisdiction  of  Massachusetts,  but  was  released  in  1658  at  his  own 
request.  He  served  as  Commissioner  from  Providence  from  1658  to  1663,  and  as 
Assistant  for  the  years  1665,  '66,  '67,  '69,  '71.  He  was  one  of  the  original  members 
of  the  church  at  Providence. 

The  home  lot  of  William  Carpenter  is  described  as  being  the  lot  that  "  Lieth 
adjoining  on  the  north  side  of  the  highway  [now  Meeting  street]  which  Leadeth 
from  the  Towne  street  into  the  neck,"  and  was  given  by  Thomas  Olney,  Jr.,  to  his 
son  William  by  will  dated  February  20,  172 1-2.     (See  Thomas  Olney.) 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Carpenter  is  now  the  property 
of  the  Friends'  Society,  having  been  purchased  in  1727,  as  appears  by  the  following 
record  of  a  meeting  of  the  Society  and  the  accompanying  notes : 

"9*^  Month  (November)  1724: 

"  Whereas  it  is  concluded  by  this  meeting,  a  house  shall  be  built  in  Provi- 
dence town,  and  there  being  a  frame  offered  to  us,  it  is  concluded  by  this  meeting 
that  if  Edward  Smith  and  Thomas  Arnold  approve  of  the  frame,  that  the  money 
be  paid  to   Daniel  Abbott,  as  quick  as  can  be,  with  convenience. 

"  The  house  was  probably  built  soon  after  this,  and  is  a  part  of  the  meeting 
house  now  standing  between  South  Court  street  and  Meeting  street.  The  deed  of 
the  lot  was  made  in  the  beginning  of  the  year  1727,  and  describes  it  as  then  having 
on  it  a  meeting  house.     An  addition  was  subsequently  made  to  it  in  the  years 

1784-5." 

Robert  Cole  "  came  to  this  country,  probably,  with  the  first  settlers  of 
Massachusetts.  His  name  is  among  those  who  desired  to  be  made  freemen,  in 
October,  1630,  and  he  was  admitted  a  freeman  on  the   i8th  of  May  following."2 

I.     Staples'  Annals  of  Prov.,  pp.  428-430.  2.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  p.  50. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  /, 


3 


He  received  a  grant  of  land  in  Providence,  June  lo,  [1637,]  was  the  fourth  named 
in  the  initial  deed,  and  was  one  of  the  four  arbiters  who  reported  a  form  of  govern- 
ment in  1640.  He  was  one  of  the  four  original  proprietors  of  Pawtuxet  who  sub- 
jected themselves  to  Massachusetts.  He  became  one  of  the  inhabitants  of  Shaw- 
omet,  and  "died  before  November,  1655,  as  appears  from  a  deed  of  that  date,  made 
by  John  Coles  to  Mary  Coles,  widow  of  Robert  Coles,  of  his  interest  in  his  father's 
estate."i 

The  3d  of  the  nth  month  [Jan.],  1652: 

"  Robert  Coles  sold  unto  Richard  Pray  and  Mary  the  wife  of  the  said  Richard 
Pray  his  house  and  house  lot  lying  betwixt  the  house  lot  of  Thomas  Olney  on  the 
south  and  the  highway  whereon  the  Pound  standeth  on  the-  north."^ 

The  eastern  end  of  this  home  lot  was  given  by  Thomas  Olney,  son  of  Thomas, 
Sr.,  to  his  son  William  in  his  will,  bearing  date  February  20,  1 720-1,  he  having 
purchased  it  of  William  Pray.     (See  Thomas  Olney.) 

The  western  part  of  the  home,  lot  of  Robert  Cole  is  now  in  the  possession  of 
Samuel  M.  Noyes,  William  V.  Wallace,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  B.  Updike,  Mrs.  Charles 
H.  Henshaw,  Mrs.  Reginald  A.  Howe,  and  A.  B.  Adams. 

Thomas  Olney  came  from  Hertford,  England,  in  1635,  with  his  wife  Mary 
(Small)  and  two  children.  He  was  a  member  of  the  church  at  Salem,  and  became 
one  of  the  original  members  of  the  church  at  Providence.  "  The  records  of  the 
town  show  that  Thomas  Olney,  senior,  came  to  Providence  about  1638.  He  was 
there  baptized,  with  his  wife,  about  1639.  They  had  a  son  Thomas,  who  came  with 
them,  a  minor,  and  who  was  afterwards  town  clerk  for  many  years.  He  is  probably 
the  person  referred  to  [as  pastor]  in  the  church  records."^  Thomas  Olney,  Jr.,  was 
born  in  Hertford,  England,  in  1631. 

Thomas  Olney,  Sr.,  was  the  ninth  named  in  the  initial  deed  from  Roger 
Williams  to  his  twelve  associates,  and  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact 
of  1640.     He  was  the   first   town    treasurer  of    Providence,  one  of   the   first  sur- 

I.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  p.  so.  2.     Trans.,  p.  78.  3.     Annals  of  Prov.,  p.  411. 


34  I' HE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


veyors ;  also  one  of  the  first  Commissioners,  and  was  appointed  to  the  ofiice  of 
Assistant  for  a  number  of  years.  By  will  dated  March  21,  1679,  he  gave  his  house 
lot  and  home  share  to  his  ^on,  Thomas  Olney/  who  gave  it  to  his  son  William, 
as  appears  by  the  following  extract  from  the  will  of  Thomas  Olney,  Jr. : 

"  I,  Thomas  Olney  Sen.  [son  of  Thomas,  Sen]  .  .  .  Give  and  bequeathe 
unto  my  son  William  Olney  my  two  home  Lotts  situate  Lieing  'and  being  in  said 
Providence  Towne,  one  of  the  which  Lotts  was  my  father  Thomas  Olney  his 
homestead  and  Lieth  adjoining  on  the  north  side  of  that  which  was  the  home- 
stead Lott  of  Thomas  Angell,  deceased,  and  on  the  south  side  of  that  which  was 
the  homestead  Lott  of  Robert  Cole,  deceased,  the  other  of  said  Lotts  Lieth 
adjoining  on  the  north  side  of  the  highway  which  Leadeth  from  the  Towne  streete 
into  the  neck,  being  that  Lott  which  was  originally  the  Lott  of  William  Carpenter, 
deceased.  Each  Lott  containing  of  about  six  acres  and  half  or  seven  acres  of  land, 
and  also  the  eastern  end  of  that  Lott  of  Land  which  was  originally  the  house  Lott 
or  homestead  Lott  of  the  aforesaid  Robert  Cole  and  since  the  homestead  of 
Richard  Pray,  deceased,  the  which  I  purchased  of  William  Pray."  ^ 

Date  of  will,  February  20,  1721-2.^  The  above  Thomas  Olney  died  June  11, 
1722.  The  western  part  of  Thomas  Olney's  home  lot  is  now  owned  by  the  City 
of  Providence. 

Thomas  Angell  "came  originally  from  London"  and  was  one  of  the  number 
who  accompanied  Roger  Williams  at  his  first  landing  at  Providence.  He  is  men- 
tioned as  "  a  young  lad  living  in  the  family  of  Roger  Williams,"  and  received  a 
grant  of  land,  and  signed  the  first  agreement  and  the  compact  of  1640.  He 
acquired  possession  of  the  home  lot  adjoining  his  own  on  the  south,  originally 
Francis  Weston's,  as  appears  by  the  following : 

"  Where  is  now  Thomas  street  was  the  original  site  of  the  Angells.  They 
added  to  their  original  home  lot  the  square  immediately  to  the  south  of  it,  part 
of  which  until  1774  was  an  orchard."3 

1.     Wills  I,  p.  43.  2.     Wills  II,  p.  126.  3.     Planting  and  Growth  of  Providence,  p.  37. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS. 


35 


Extract  from  Thomas  Angell's  will :  "  I  do  give  and  bequeathe  unto  my  son 
James  Angell  my  dwelling  house  .  .  .  and  my  house  lot  or  share  of  land 
whereon  the  said  house  standeth,  together  with  my  other  house  lot  or  home  share 
of  land  to  it  adjoining."^  Date  of  will,  May  23,  1685.  Date  of  probate  of  will, 
September  18,  1694. 

"  I  James  Angell  of  Providence  .  .  .  Quitclaim  unto  my  brother  John 
Angell  .  .  .  two  home  lots  which  formerly  belonged  to  my  honored  father 
James  Angell,  deceased  ...  his  homestead,  the  which  two  lotts  of  land  bound- 
eth  as  follows  ...  on  the  north  with  the  land  of  Mr.  Thomas  Olney  and  on 
the  south  with  the  land  of  Mr.  Nathaniel  Waterman  and  on  the  East  with  a  high- 
way and  on  the  west  with  the  Towne  streete,  excepting  only  a  small  piece  I  Reserve 
at  the  North  West  Corner  adjoining  to  the  town  streete,  that  is  to  say  to  extend 
from  the  said  Thomas  Olney 's  land  southward  twelve  yards  and  from  the  Towne 
Streete  Eastward  twenty  yards."^     April  4,1 711. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Thomas  Angell  is  now  owned  by  Eliza 
F.  Man,  Anna  H.  Man,  and  the  heirs  of  William  Goddard. 

Francis  Weston  was  admitted  a  freeman  of  Massachusetts  in  November, 
1633.  He  was  one  of  the  deputies  from  Salem  to  the  General  Court  in  1634,  and 
after  his  removal  to  Providence  was  the  tenth  named  in  the  initial  deed  of  Williams 
to  his  associates.  He  joined  in  the  purchase  of  Warwick,  and  became  one  of  the 
victims  of  the  raid  by  the  Massachusetts  soldiery  upon  that  unhappy  colony,  having 
"  through  cold  and  hardship  in  prison,  fell  into  a  consumption,  and  in  a  short  time 
after  [before  June  4,  1645,]  died  of  it."^ 

Thus  perished  as  a  martyr,  sentenced  for  "heresy,"  "to  be  set  on  work  and  to 
wear  such  bolts  and  irons  as  may  hinder  his  escape  "^  from  the  prison  at  Dorchester, 
the  original  owner  of  the  home  lot  in  Providence  whereon  now  stands  the  first 
Baptist  church  in  America,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the  original  members. 

1.  Wills  I,  p.  205.  3.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  pp.  90  and  102. 

2.  Deeds  II,  p.  617.  4.     Ibid,  p.  277. 


36  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

The  home  lot  of  Francis  Weston  became  the  property  of  Thomas  Angell, 
(see  Thomas  Angell,)  and  was  by  him  given  to  his  son  James  by  will,  dated  May 
23,  1685,  and  by  James,  son  of  the  above  James,  was  transferred  by  deed,  April  4, 
i7ii,tohis  brother  John,  who  sold  the  portion  of  it  now  occupied  by  the  First 
Baptist  Church  to  William  Russell,  in  1774,  by  whom  it  was  in  the  same  year  trans- 
ferred to  the  First  Baptist  Society.  "  This  church  was  opened  for  public  worship 
for  the  first  time  on  the  28th  day  of  May,  1775,  though  it  was  not  completed  until 
some  months  after  this."  The  first  twelve  members  of  this  church  were  Roger 
Williams,  Ezekiel  Holliman,  William  Arnold,  William  Harris,  Stukely  Westcott, 
John  Greene,  Richard  Waterman,  Thomas  James,  Robert  Cole,  William  Carpenter, 
Francis  Weston,  and  Thomas  Olney.^ 

Richard  Waterman,  according  to  Felt's  "Annals  of  Salem,"  arrived  at 
Salem  on  the  i6th  day  of  June,  1629.  "On  the  12th  March,  1638,  he  was 
licensed  by  the  General  Court  of  Massachusetts  to  remove  out  of  that  jurisdic- 
tion, provided  he  removed  his  family  before  the  next  General  Court.  Francis 
Weston,  Stukely  Westcott,  Richard  Carder,  Thomas  Olney  and  others  were  also 
included  in  the  same  sentence."^  He  removed  from  Salem  after  Williams's  banish- 
ment and  settled  with  him  at  Providence,  and  was  the  eleventh  named  in  the 
initial  deed.  He  served  as  member  of  the  Town  Council,  1651,  and  was  a  Commis- 
sioner for  the  years  1650-2-5-6.  He  acquired  possession  of  the  home  lot  of 
Ezekiel  Holliman,  the  lot  next  south  of  his  own,  and  was  also  one  of  the  purchasers 
of  Shawomet.  "  He  did  not  remove  to  Shawomet,  but  resided  at  Providence  and 
Newport  till  his  death,  which  was  in  the  month  of  October,  1673."  He  was  buried 
on  that  portion  of  his  estate  which  was  originally  the  home  lot  of  Ezekiel  Holliman. 
A  granite  monument  marks  the  spot. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Richard  Waterman  is  now  owned  by  the 
Charitable  Baptist  Society,  and  is  the  southern  part  of  the  lot  now  occupied  by  the 
First  Baptist  Church. 

I.     Benedict's  History  of  the  Baptists,  Vol.  I,  p.  473.  2.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  p.  88. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  37 


Ezekiel  Holliman  is  said  to  have  been  born  at  Tring,  Hertford  county, 
England.  He  came  to  this  country  about  1634,  and  in  1637  was  a  resident  of 
Salem.  He  removed  to  Providence,  and  was  the  twelfth  and  last  named  in  the 
initial  deed. 

In  1638-9,  Roger  Williams  becoming  dissatisfied  with  his  early  baptism,  it  was 
decided  that  Ezekiel  Holliman,  "  a  man  of  gifts  and  piety,"  should  be  appointed  to 
administer  the  ordinance  by  immersion,  which  being  done,  Mr.  Williams  in  return 
baptized  Mr.  Holliman  and  ten  others.  This  was  the  origin  of  the  present  First 
Baptist  Church  of  Providence.  This  church  was  ministered  to  by  Roger  Williams, 
Ezekiel  Holliman  being  his  assistant. 

Soon  after  the  settlement  of  the  church,  about  1642,  Holliman  removed  to 
Warwick,  where  he  filled  offices  of  trust.  He  was  appointed  Deputy  to  the 
General  Court,  and  also  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  reuniting  Providence, 
Portsmouth,  Newport  and  Warwick  into  one  corporate  body. 

Hugh  Bewit  became  the  owner  of  the  home  lot  of  Ezekiel  Holliman,  as  appears 
from  the  following  extract  from  the  town  records : 

w^yth  jjth  j^Q    [Jan.]   1650. 

"  Hugh  Bewit  sold  unto  Richard  Waterman  his  house  &  house  lot  lying  next 
to  the  house  lot  of  the  said  Richard  Waterman  whereon  he  now  dwells  and  on  the 
South  Side  lyeth  Stukely  Westcott's  house  lot."^ 

The  western  part  of  Ezekiel  HoUiman's  home  lot  is  now  included  in  the 
Waterman  estate. 

Stukely  Westcott  and  wife  were  members  of  the  church  at  Salem.  They 
removed  to  Providence  in  April,  1638,  were  baptized  by  Roger  Williams,  and 
became  original  members  of  the  Baptist  Church. 

His  name  is  the  first  mentioned  in  the  initial  deed  from  Roger  Williams  to  his 
twelve  associates,  the  original  proprietors.     He  received  a  home  lot,  signed  the  com- 

I.    Trans.,  p.  125. 


38  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


pact  of  1 640,  and  a  few  years  later  removed  to  Warwick,  where  he  was  appointed 
Commissioner  to  represent  the  town,  which  office  he  held  for  a  number  of  years, 
and  died  in  1677  at  an  advanced  age. 

"  12*^  3"^  month  [May]  1652. 

"  Stukely  Westcott  sold  to  Samuel  Bennett  his  house  and  house  lot  lying 
betwixt  Richard  Waterman  &  Robert  Williams  house  lot  with  Orchard  and  •  all 
other  appurtenances  thereto  belonging."^     Also  other  lands. 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Stukely  Westcott 
are  Thomas  Breck,  James  T.  Rhodes  estate,  Hiram  B.  Aylesworth,  Eliza  B.  Patten, 
and  Newton  Dexter. 

William  Reynolds  received  a  grant  of  land  in  the  second  year  of  the 
Plantation.     He  signed  the  first  agreement,  also  the  compact  of  1640. 

February  8,  1664-5,  Robert  Williams,  of  Newport,  schoolmaster,  sold  to  John 
Scott,  of  Providence,  "  his  dwelling  house  in  Providence  with  ye  housing,  home 
share  and  orchard  as  I  bought  them  of  Wm.  Reynolds."^ 

The  present  owners  of  western  part  of  William  Reynolds'  home  lot  are  Eliza 
B.  Patten,  and  Newton  Dexter. 

Daniel  Abbott  received  a  home  lot.  He  "stayed  and  went  not  away" 
during  King  Philip's  war.  At  the  close  of  the  war  he  was  appointed  town  clerk, 
and  the  records  which  had  been  preserved  were  "  handed  over  to  him."  December 
22,  1679,  he  petitioned  the  town  "that  they  agree  lovingly  together  for  the  building 
them  a  town  house  to  keep  their  meetings  in,"  which  appears  not  to  have  been 
favorably  received. 

"  Providence,  27^'^  8'*^  mo.  [Oct.]  1644  (so  called)." 

Robert  Morris  sold  to  Robert  Williams  "ye  house  and  ground  which  lies 
between  William  Reynolds  and  Chad  Brown,  so  much  as  lies  between  the  fence."3 

I.    Trans.,  p.  77.  2.    Deeds  I,  p.  4,  3.    Deeds  I,  p.  10. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS. 


39 


October  i,  1665,  Robert  Williams  sold  to  "  Daniel  Abbott  (who  formerly  was 
my  servant)  ...  a  house  lot  or  home  share  of  land  ...  5  acres,  more  or 
less,  .  .  .  in  ye  row  of  house  lots,  .  .  .  bounded  east  by  common,  west  by 
town  street  or  common  highway,  north  by  land  of  John  Scott,  south  by  home  lot  or 
home  share  formerly  belonging  to  Chad  Brown  dec'd — now  Thomas  Bakers  .  .  . 
Ye  said  house  lot  or  home  share  originally  belonged  to  Daniel  Abbott,  Sen.  father 
of  the  above  said  Daniel  Abbott  and  was  sold  by  Daniel  Abbott,  Sen.  to  Robert 
Morris  and  by  Morris  to  me  said  Robert  Williams."^ 

The  western  front  of  this  home  lot  is  now  owned  by  the  What  Cheer  Corpo- 
ration. 

Chad  Brown,  "  the  first  elder "  of  the  Baptist  Church  in  Providence,  was 
born  in  England  about  the  year  1600.  It  is  supposed  that  he  came  to  America  in 
the  ship  Martin,  July,  1638.  He  came  to  Providence  soon  after  its  settlement,  was 
a  signer  of  the  first  agreement,  and  one  of  the  number  appointed  to  draw  up  the 
compact  of  1640.  He  was  formally  ordained  pastor  of  the  church  in  Providence  in 
1642,  and  performed  the  duties  of  the  ofhce  until  his  death,  which  occurred  not 
far  from  1663.     He  was  one  of  the  early  surveyors  of  Providence. 

"  Roger  Williams,  in  his  plea  before  the  Court  of  the  New  England  Colonies, 
in  Providence,  in  the  year  1677,  gives  the  following  brief  but  comprehensive  view 
of  Mr.  Brown's  character  and  personal  influence  : 

"  The  truth  is,  Chad  Browne,  that  wise  and  godly  soul  (now  with  God)  with 
myself,  brought  the  remaining  aftercomers  and  the  first  twelve  to  a  oneness  by 
arbitration."^ 

"  It  appears  that  the  committee  which  formed  the  original  list  of  lots,  and 
probably  the  "  Towne  Streete,"  on  which  they  lay,  consisted  of  Chad  .Brown,  John 
Throckmorton,  and  Gregory  Dexter."^ 

I.     Deeds  I,  p.  lo. 
,  2.     James  Manning  and  the  Early  History  of  Brown  University,  by  Reuben  Aldridge  Guild,  p.  145. 
3.     Dorr's  Planting  and  Growth  of  Providence,  p.  18. 


40 


THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


December  31,  1672 : 

"  I  John  Brown  of  Providence  .  .  .  have  freely  given  .  .  .  unto  my 
brother  James  Browne  of  Newport  .  .  .a  House  Lott,  or  Home  share 
.  .  .  sd  parcell  of  Land  formerly  belonged  unto  my  father  Chadd  Browne  (now 
deceased)  he  being  possessed  with  ye  same  from  ye  aforesaid  Towne  of  Provi- 
dence ...  It  being  his  House  Lott  or  home  Share  &  containing  in  quantity 
about  five  acres,  (more  or  less,)  It  bounding  on  ye  northern  side  with  a  home  share 
of  land  formerly  belonging  unto  Daniel  Abbott  of  ye  said  Towne  of  Providence 
(deceased)  but  now  in  ye  possession  of  Daniel  Abbott  his  son,  on  ye  Southerne 
side  with  a  home  share  of  Land  formerly  belonging  unto  George  Rickards 
(Deceased)  but  now  in  ye  possession  of  Mrs.  Deborah  ffeild,  on  ye  Eastern  End 
with  ye  common  on  ye  western  end  with  a  highway  or  Towne  Strett  .  .  .  The 
sd  share  of  Land  became  my  Right  by  Recession  from  my  mother  Elizabeth  my 
father's  wife  according  as  my  sd  father  Chad  Browne  by  his  will  disposed  ye  same 
.  .  .  ■  Reserving  only  to  myself  my  heirs  &  assigns  Twenty  foott  square  of  ye 
sd  Land  with  ye  orchard  where  my  sd  father  &  mother  is  buried,  with  free  egress 
from  ye  sd  place."^ 

December  31,  1672,  James  Brown  sold  the  above  described  home  lot  to  Daniel 
Abbott.2 

In  1723  the  Congregational  Society  erected  their  first  house  of  worship  in 
Providence  at  the  corner  of  College  and  Benefit  streets,  on  land  originally  the 
home  lot  of  Chad  Brown.  The  Society  sold  this  house  to  the  town  in  1794  and 
built  a  more  spacious  and  elegant  one  at  the  corner  of  Benevolent  and  Benefit 
streets,  which  was  dedicated  August  16,  1795.  This  house  was  ornamented  with 
two  spires,  and  was  a  beautiful  copy  of  one  of  the  most  beautiful  houses  of  worship 
in  Boston.  It  was  destroyed  by  fire  on  the  morning  of  the  14th  of  June,  18 14. 
The  church  now  occupying  the  same  site  was  dedicated  on  the  31st  of  October, 
1816.' 

Brown  University  is  located  upon  the  home  lot  of  Chad  Brown,  the  ancestor  of 
Nicholas  Brown,  its  most  munificent   benefactor.     The    University   grounds   also 

I.     Deeds  I,  p.  ii.  2.     Deeds  I,  p.  12.  3.     Staples' Annals  Prov.,  pp.  438-439. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  41 


include  portions  of  the  home  lots  of  Daniel  Abbott  and  William  Reynolds  on  the 
north,  and  John  Warner  and  George  Rickard  on  the  south. 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Chad  Brown  are 
William  M.  Bailey,  trustee  for  Mrs.  A.  G.  Van  Zandt,  and  Marshall  Woods  and  wife. 

John  Warner,  a  "citizen  and  freeman  of  London,"  signed  the  first  agree- 
ment, and  was  one  of  the  four  arbiters  who  reported  a  form  of  government  in  1640. 
January  12,  1642-3,  he  joined  with  ten  others  in  the  purchase  of  Shawomet,  or 
Warwick,  "  for  one  hundreth  and  ffortie  4  ffatham  of  wamppampeague."  "  The  first 
records  of  Warwick  appear  to  be  in  his  handwriting.  He  was  Town  Clerk,  member 
of  the  Town  Council,  Deputy  and  Assistant  for  the  town  of  Warwick,  between  the 
years  1647  ^^^  1652.  He  was  also  Clerk  or  Secretary  of  the  General  Court  of  the 
Colony  of  Providence  Plantations  in  1648."^  On  the  24th  of  April,  1652,  at  a  town 
meeting  in  Warwick,  John  Warner,  for  grave  misdemeanors,  was  degraded  from 
holding  any  office  in  the  town  until  he  give  the  town  satisfaction. 

December  16,  1663,  George  Kenrick  of  Newport  sold  to  William  Field  of 
Providence  a  lot  of  land  "  formerly  the  home  share  of  John  Warner  .  .  .  about 
3  1-2  acres.  .  .  .  Bounded  east  with  a  parcel  of  land  now  in  the  possession  of 
Thomas  Baker  of  Newport,  the  which  parcel  of  land  was  formerly  part  of  the  above 
named  lot  .  .  .  west  with  the  town  street  or  highway,  on  the  north  side  with 
the  home  share  of  land  of  Chadd  Brown  deceased,  but  now  in  the  possession  of  the 
aforesaid  Thomas  Baker  his  successor,  and  on  the  south  side  with  the  land  of  the 
aforesaid  William  Field.  .  .  .  The  said  John  Warner  also  building  the  said 
house  upon  the  aforesaid  land  and  afterward  did  by  sale  pass  away  the  said  house 
and  land  unto  the  above  named  Wm.  Field  who  transferred  it  to  George  Rickard 
also  formerly  an  inhabitant  of  the  said  town  of  Providence  the  said  house  and  land 
being  after  the  decease  of  the  aforesaid  Geo.  Rickard  by  will  disposed  of  unto  me 
the  said  Geo.  Kendrick."^ 

Present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  John  Warner : 
John  Carter  Brown  estate,  Hope  B.  Russell,  and  Amasa  S.  Westcott. 

I.     Col.  of  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  p.  55.  2.     Trans.,  p.  35. 


42  THE    HOME    LOTS     OF 

George  Rickard  signed  the  first  agreement  and  received  a  home  lot.  He 
purchased  of  William  Field  the  house  and  home  lot  originally  John  Warner's,  and 
died  previous  to  December  i6,  1663. 

The  home  lot  of  George  Rickard,  after  his  decease,  became  the  property  of 
Mrs.  Deborah  Field,  as  appears  by  the  following  from  the  town  records : 

December  31,  1672: 

"  I,  John  Brown,  .  .  .  have  freely  given  .  .  .  unto  my  brother  James 
Brown  ...  a  House  Lott  or  home  share  .  .  .  sd  parcel  of  land  formerly 
belonged  to  my  father,  Chadd  Browne  (now  deceased)  .  .  .  bounding  on  ye 
northern  side  with  a  home  share  of  land  formerly  belonging  unto  Daniel  Abbott 
.  .  .  (deceased)  .  .  .  on  ye  Southern  side  with  a  home  share  of  land  for- 
merly belonging  unto  George  Rickards  (Deceased)  but  now  in  ye  possession  of 
Mrs.  Deborah  ffeild."^ 

John  Brown,  son  of  Chad  Brown,  on  the  3d  of  December,  1672,  purchased  the 
eastern  part  of  George  Rickard's  home  lot,  and  on  the  21st  of  the  same  month 
transferred  it  to  his  brother  Jeremiah,  who  sold  it  on  the  30th  of  the  same  month 
to  Daniel  Abbott.2 

'  The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  are  Robert  H.  I. 
Goddard,  Elizabeth  A.  Shepard,  John  Carter  Brown  estate,  and  Elizabeth  A.  Gam- 
mell,  wife  of  William. 

Richard  Scott  "was  admitted  a  member  of  the  Boston  Church,  August  28, 
1634.  He  married  a  sister  of  the  famous  Mrs.  Hutchinson,  and  removed  with  her 
from  Massachusetts.  .  .  .  Scott  afterwards  became  a  Quaker,  and  Gov.  Hop- 
kins says,  the  first  of  that  sect  in  New  England.  He  was  one  of  the  early  settlers 
in  Providence.  The  tradition  is,  that  his  wife  and  daughter,  in  1657,  were  whipped 
ten  lashes  in  Boston,  for  visiting  a  Quaker  prisoner  there."^  He  received  a  home 
lot  in  Providence,  signed  the  first  agreement  and  the  compact  of  1640.  His  name 
appears  on  the  roll  of  freemen  in  Providence  in  1655,  and  in   1666  he  served  as 

I.     Deeds  I,  p.  ii.  2.     Deeds  I,  p.  4-12-13.  3.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  p.  113. 


THE    PRO  VIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  43 


Deputy.     The  home  lots  of  Widow  Reeve  and  Joshua  Verin  came  into  his  posses- 
sion, as  appears  by  deed  of  Charles  Dyer  to  Nathaniel  Brown. 1     (See  Joshua  Verin.) 

The  home  lot  of  Richard  Scott  became  the  property  of  William  Field,  as 
appears  by  the  following  record: 

"At  a  Towne  meeting  Jan.  28*  1677: 
being  the  Towne's  quarter  day 

It  is  granted  unto  Thomas  ffeild.  Heire  unto  William  ffeild  (Deceased)  that  he 
may  have  his  House  lotts  recorded  in  our  Towne  records,  he  paying  the  Clerkes 
ffees.  .  .  .  The  sayd  lotts  belonging  to  ye  sd  Thomas  ffeild  are  Bounded  on 
the  west  with  the  Towne  street,  on  the  South  with  the  lott  of  John  ffeild,  on  the 
East  with  the  highway  or  Comon,  on  the  north  with  the  lott  of  George  Ricketts 
now  in  the  possession  of  the  sayd  Thomas  ffeild  and  partly  with  the  land  of  Chad 
Browne  now  in  the  possession  of  Daniel  Abbott."^  Richard  Scott  died  previous  to 
May  27,  1685. 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Richard  Scott 
are  the  Rhode  Island  Hospital  Trust  Company  and  the  Joseph  Balch  estate. 

William  Field  signed  the  compact  of  1640,  and  in  1647  was  appointed  on  a 
committee  to  form  a  plan  of  government.  He  was  Assistant  for  a  number  of  years, 
1650,  and  from  1658  to  1665,,  and  Commissioner  from  1656  to  1663.  The  Fields 
"  were  among  the  early  planters,  and  for  long  among  the  chief  landholders  of  the 
town.     '  Fields'  Point '  is  a  memorial  of  one  of  the  first  members  of  the  family."^ 

The  house  of  William  Field  stood  a  little  east  of  where  the  Providence  Bank 
now  is,  and  was  occupied  as  a  "  Garrison  house  during  Philip's  war."  "  It  was  one 
of  the  largest  houses  of  that  time,  and  when  the  town  gave  leave  to  the  citizens 
to  '  fortify '  themselves,  this,  with  other  of  the  strongest  buildings,  was  '  fortified  ' 
with  iron  gratings  at  the  windows.  This,  with  the  other  places  of  security,  which 
the   Indians  did  not  venture  to  attack,  saved  that  part  of  the  town  from  the  con- 

1.  Deeds  II,  pp.  300-302. 

2.  Record  of  Town  Meetings,  Book  III,  p.  5. 

3.  Planting  and  Growth  of  Providence,  p.  36. 


44  I^HE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

flagration  of  March,  1676.  .  .  .  The  'Garrison  house'  remained  until  1772. 
It  stood  about  forty  or  fifty  feet  from  the  Town  street.  The  last  of  the  original 
owners  of  the  site  sold  it  in  that  year  (Feb.,  1772,)  to  Joseph  Brown,  who  in  the 
year  1774  built  there  the  house  now  owned  by  the  Providence  Bank."i  The 
home  lot  adjoining  him  on  the  north  (Richard  Scott's)  became  his  and  was,  with 
the  original  home  lot  of  William  Field,  after  his  decease,  transferred  by  the  town, 
January  28,  1677,  to  his  heir,  Thomas  Field.     (See  Richard  Scott.) 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Field 
are  the  Providence  National  Bank  and  the  Providence  Institution  for  Savings. 

John  Field  "removed  from  Bridgewater  to  Providence  soon  after  its  settle- 
ment." He  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  first  agreement  and  the  compact 
of  1640. 

"  Whereas  there  is  a  highway  [now  Crawford  street.]  lieing  from  ye  Towne 
streete  to  ye  side  (or  to  say  the  salt  water)  the  which  lieth  against  ye  house  lot 
which  formerly  belonged  to  John  Field.  The  which  lot  is  now  in  ye  possession 
of  ye  heirs  of  Gideon  Crawford.     Recorded  Feb.  2,  1708-9."^ 

This  home  lot  was  in  the  possession  of  Gideon  Crawford,  May  7,  1691.  (See 
Joshua  Winsor.) 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  John  Field  are 
the  heirs  of  Isaac  Brown  and  the  heirs  of  Rufus  Greene. 

Joshua  Winsor  came  from  the  borough  of  Windsor,  England.  He  received 
a  home  lot,  and  signed  the  first  agreement  and  the  compact  of  1640.  "  Five  of  the 
descendants  of  his  only  son  Samuel,  all  of  the  name  of  Winsor,  were  settled  Bap- 
tist ministers  within  the  State  of  Rhode  Island." 

May  7,  169 1  : 

"  I,  Samuel  Winsor,  ...  of  Providence  ...  for  a  valuable  consid- 
eration    .     .    .    have  sold    .    .    .     unto  Gideon  Crawford  a  home  lott  in  the 

1.     Planting  and  Growth  of  Providence,  p.  37.  2.    Deeds  I,  p.  55. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  ac 


Town  of  Providence  known  by  ye  name  of  Shepard's  lott  which  lott  in  the  original 
was  my  father  Joshua  Winsor's  but  since  in  consideration  of  Keeping  the  Antientt 
man  it  became  mine,  which  is  in  Estimation  four  or  five  acres  be  it  more  or  less. 
It  being  bounded  on  ye  south  with  ye  land  now  in  ye  possession  of  Thomas  Field, 
on  ye  west  with  a  Highway  fronting  against  the  salt  river,  on  the  north  with  the  land 
of  ye  said  Crawford,  and  on  ye  east  with  a  highway."^ 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Joshua  Winsor  is  now  owned  by  Eliza- 
beth S.  Howard  and  Henry  J.  Steere. 

Thomas  Harris  "  was  received  a  purchaser  of  Providence  previous  to  Aug. 
20,  1637.  He  was  brother  to  William  Harris.  He  left  a  will  which  was  proved 
July  20,  1686."  He  signed  the  first  agreement  and  the  compact  of  1640  and  was 
appointed  Commissioner  from  Providence  for  a  number  of  years,  and  was  a  member 
of  the  Committee  appointed  February  19,  1665,  to  run  the  seven-mile  line.  His 
home  lot  was  the  property  of  Thomas  Field,  May  7,  1691.     (See  Joshua  Winsor.) 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  of  Thomas  Harris  is  now  owned  by  Henry 
J.  Steere. 

Adam  Goodwin  signed  the  compact  of  1640  and  received  a  home  lot. 

"  The  ist  of  January  1648  (so  called)  Adam  Goodwin  sold  unto  Richard  Osbon 
all  his  right  in  Providence  both  housing  and  all  other  Privileges,  only  the  said 
Richard  Osbon  hath  granted  Adam  Goodwin  the  house  and  yard  during  his  wife's 
life,  only  the  said  Adam  Goodwin  is  to  repair  it."^ 

"27*^  of  the  s^*"  month  [July]   1650  (called). 

"  Richard  Osborne  sold  unto  Thomas  Harris  the  house  and  house  lot  which 
the  said  Richard  Osborne  bought  of  Adam  Goodwin,  only  the  said  Adam  Good- 
win's wife  shall  have  liberty  to  dwell  in  the  said  house  according  to  the  agreement 
made  and  reserved  at  first  by  the  said  Adam."^ 

I.     Deeds  II,  p.  112.  2.     Trans.,  p.  77-  3-     Trans.,  p.  125. 


46  '  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

February  12,  1702-3: 

Adam  Goodwin's  home  lot  "formerly  belonged  unto  Thomas  Harris,  Senr."^ 
and  on  the  20th  of  November,  1728,  it  was  owned  by  William  Field  and  Robert 
Gibbs.     (See  William  Burrows.) 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Adam  Goodwin  is  now  in  the  possession 
of  the  heirs  of  Ezra  W.  Howard  and  Elizabeth  S.  Howard. 

William  Burrows  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 
At  a  Town  Meeting,  October  the  12th,  1663: 

"  Ordered  that  the  Town  deputies  shall  go  to  all  the  Inhabitants  belonging 
unto  this  Town,  see  what  will  be  freely  contributed  towards  the  relief  of  William 
Burrows :  and  if  a  considerable  sum  cannot  be  granted  in  that  way  for  them  to 
make  Report  unto  the  Town  and  for  the  Town  to  levy  a  rate  upon  the  inhabitants 
for  the  relief  of  the  said  William  Burrows."^ 

January  28,  1705-6: 

"  An  account  of  what  land  belongs  to  John  and  Mary  Lapham  in  Providence 
on  the  East  side  of  the  seven  mile  line,  ffirst.  Two  Lotts  in  the  Towne,  namely, 
the  Lotts  of  William  Mann  &  William  Burrows."^ 

"  Articles  of  partition  and  quitclaim  made  this  20th  day  of  November,  A.  D. 
1728,  .  .  .  between  John  Lapham  and  Nicholas  Lapham  both  of  Dartmouth 
.  .  .  possessed  by  deeds  of  Gift  from  our  Honored  father  John  Lapham, 
deceased.  .  .  .  First  the  said  John  Lapham  is  to  have  the  two  home  lots  in 
the  Town,  called  six  acre  Lotts  Lieing  betwixt  the  Land  belonging  to  the  Heirs  of 
Daniel  Williams,  deceased,  and  that  which  was  the  homestead  land  of  Thomas 
Harris,  deceased,  now  in  possession  of  William  Field  and  Robert  Gibbs."^ 

The  house  in  which  the  capture  of  the  Gaspee  was  planned  was  located  on  the 
home  lot  of  William  Burrows,  at  the  corner  of  South  Main  and  Planet  streets. 
The  following  in  regard  to  the  preparation  for  this  expedition,  and  the  location 
of  the  house,  is  an  abbreviated  transcript  from  the  account  given  in  the  Rhode 
Island  Colonial  Records,  Vol.  VII,  p.  69,  70: 

I.     Trans.,  p.  373.  2.     Trans.,  p.  167.  3.     Deeds  II,  p.  25.  4.     Deeds  VII,  p.  424. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  47 


"  John  Brown,  one  of  the  first  and  most  respectable  merchants  of  Providence 
resolved  on  the  destruction  of  the  Gaspee,  and  directed  one  of  his  trusty  ship- 
masters to  collect  eight  of  the  largest  long  boats  in  the  harbor,  and  to  place  them 
at  Fenner's  wharf,  directly  opposite  to  the  dwelling  of  Mr.  James  Sabin.  This 
house,  then  unfinished,  was  occupied  as  an  inn.  It  was  soon  after  purchased  and 
completed  by  Welcome  Arnold,  who  resided  there  till  his  death,  in  1 798.  It  then 
became  the  residence  of  his  eldest  son,  Samuel  G.  Arnold,  and  subsequently  of  his 
son,  Richard  J.  Arnold,  who  altered  and  enlarged  it  materially.  The  house  is  on 
the  east  side  of  South  Main  street,  on  the  northeast  corner  of  Planet  street." 

The  present  owner  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Burrows 
is  the  Providence  Institution  for  Savings. 


William  Mann  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  His 
home  lot  in  1705-6  was  owned  by  John  and  Mary  Lapham.  (See  William 
Burrows.) 

The  western  part  of  the  home  lot  is  now  owned  by  the  Arnold  Estate  Com- 
pany, Elizabeth  B.  Updike,  Mrs.  Charles  H.  Henshaw,  Mrs.  Reginald  Howe,  and 
A.  B.  Adams. 

William  Wickenden  removed  from  Salem,  and  was  received  a  purchaser 
at  Providence,  before  August  20,  1637.  He  signed  the  first  agreement,  also  the 
compact  of  1640,  and  is  named  in  the  deed  of  confirmation.  He  was  one  of  the 
first  Commissioners  from  Providence,  a  member  of  the  Town  Council  in  i65i,a 
member  of  the  Committee  appointed  to  form  a  plan  of  government  in  1647,  and  a 
member  of  the  Committee  appointed  in  April,  1661,  to  run  the  boundary  line. 
"  He  was  colleague  with  Chad  Brown,  in  the  pastoral  charge  of  the  Baptist  Church 
at  Providence,"  and  "  was  at  one  time  in  New  York,  where,  it  is  said,  he  preached 
and  was  imprisoned  for  it  about  four  months.     He  died  Feb.  23,  1670."^    ' 

I.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'j,  Vol.  II,  p.  109. 


48  THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 

"The  21^*  September  1646. 

"  William  Wickenden  sold  unto  Christopher  Unthank  his  house  and  home 
lot  excepting  two  pole  square  of  Ground  on  the  south  corner  next  the  street 
[Power  street]  which  Nathaniel  Dickens  now  possesseth."' 

"27^  11^  Month  1650. 

"  Mr.  Throckmorton  sold  unto  Mr.  Sayles  the  house  and  lot  which  was 
Nathaniel  Dickens,  which  Mr. bought  of  Mr.  Ralph  Earle  formerly  belong- 
ing to  William  Wickenden."^ 

May   12,  1652 : 

John  Sailes  "  bought  of  William  Wickenden,  '  2  poles  square  lying  at  the 
south  side  of  Mr.  Sayles  new  home  lot  next  unto  the  highway.'  "^ 

March  28,  1664-5  • 

"  Upon  the  request  of  Daniel  Williams  it  is  granted  unto  him  to  make  use 
of  the  highway,  [now  Power  street]  lying  between  Mr.  Sailes  lot  and  Jane  Power's 
lot,  and  upon  the  same  conditions  as  Mr.  Sailes  formerly  used  the  same."^ 

The  home  lot  of  William  Wickenden  in  1728  "belonged  to  the  heirs  of  Daniel 
Williams,  deceased."     (See  William  Mann.) 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Wicken- 
den are  E.  Bigelow  Adams  and  the  West  Providence  Land  Company. 

Nicholas  Power  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  He 
died  August  25,  1657,  intestate,  and  on  the  27th  of  May,  1667,  the  Town  Council 
made  his  will  and  disposed  of  his  estate.  His  home  lot  became  the  property  of  his 
widow,  Jane. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Nicholas  Power  is  now  in  the  possession 
of  Cornelia  C.  Greene,  the  heirs  of  Rhoda  Steere,  and  John  W.  Smith,  trustee. 

1.  Trans.,  p.  76.  3.     Narragansett  Hist.  Reg.,  Vol.  II,  p.  293. 

2.  Ibid,  p.  125.  4.     Trans.,  p.  171. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  40 


Joane  Tiler  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 

"26th  day  of  May,  1663: 

"  I,  John   Sayles  of  Providence     .     .     .     for  a  valuable  sum  of   money  paid 
unto  me  by  William  Hawkins  inhabitant  of  ye  Towne  aforesaid    .    .    .    have    .    . 
sould  unto  ye  said  William  Hawkins     .     .     .     ye  right  which  I   bought  of  Ralph 
Earle,  which  he  bought  of  Nathaniel  Dickens,  which  formerly  belonged  unto  Joane 
Tiler  afterwards  wife  unto  ye  said  Nathaniel  Dickens. 


"1 


"27.  5  mo.  1650: 

"  Nathaniel   Dickens  sold  unto  Nicholas   Power  his  home  lot  lying  next    to 
Widow  Sayles  her  home  lot."2 

The  present  owners  of  the  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Joane  Tiler  are 
Julia  Bullock  and  John  W.  Smith,  trustee. 

Jane  Sears  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  This 
home  lot  came  into  the  possession  of  Daniel  Williams,  son  of  Roger,  as  appears 
by  the  will  of  Daniel,  made  on  the  9th  of  May,  171 2,  five  days  before  his  death,  by 
which  he  gives  to  his  son,  Roger  Williams,  his  homestead,  a  home  lot  on  the  town 
street,-  bounded  on  the  south  with  the  lot  of  William  Hopkins,  and  on  the  north 
with  the  lot  of  Nicholas  Power,  [originally  the  home  lot  of  Joane  Tiler,]  with  a 
dwelling  house,  etc. ;  "  provided  he  disturb  not  his  mother  Rebekah  Williams 
of  her  reasonable  privilege  and  benefit  in  said  dwelling  house  and  premises  during 
her  natural  life."^  To  his  daughter  Patience  he  gave  a  home  lot  on  the  Town  Street 
[originally  Edward  Hart's]  that  he  bought  of  Richard  and  Ann  Waterman,  October 
30,  1698,  bounded  by  the  lot  of  William  Hopkins  on  the  north,  and  the  lot  of 
Samuel  Winsor  on  the  south,  and  described  as  near  the  salt  water  at  the  south  end 
of  the  town.^ 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Jane  Sears  is  now  the  property  of  the 
heirs  of  William  Thayer,  Marcy  A.  and  Julia  Earle,  and  the  heirs  of  George  Earle. 

1.  Deeds,  No.  i,  p.  30.  3.  Deeds  A  X,  311. 

3.  Deeds,  &c.,  Trans.,  p.  125.  4.  Deeds  XIX,  506. 


50  THE    HOME    LOTS     OF 


Thomas  Hopkins  was  born  in  England,  April  7,  1616.  He  received  a 
home  lot  in  Providence,  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640,  He  was  a  member  of 
the  church  at  Providence.  He  was  appointed  Commissioner  for  a  number  of  years, 
and  was  a  member  of  the  Town  Council  in  1667  and  1672.  He  died  at  Little- 
worth,  Oyster  Bay,  Long  Island,  in  1684,  at  the  residence  of  his  daughter-in-law, 
Elizabeth.     His  home  lot  became  the  property  of  his  son  William. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Thomas  Hopkins  is  now  owned  by 
Sarah  A.  Congdon  and  Lydia  A.  Godfrey. 

Edward  Hart  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 

"28.  i^*  mo.  so  called  [March]   1679: 

Robert  West  sold  all  his  lands  to  Resolved  Waterman.  "  His  house  lot 
[formerly  Edward  Hart's  home  lot,]  four  acres,  .  .  .  bounded  west  on  street, 
north  by  the  home  lot  of  Thomas  Hopkins,  east  by  highway,  south  by  home 
lot  of  Joshua  Winsor."^ 

October  30,  1698: 

"  I,  Richard  Waterman,  .  .  .  have  sold  ...  to  Daniel  Williams  .  .  . 
one  house  lot  in  Providence  joining  to  the  Lott  of  Samuel  Winsor  on  the  South 
and  the  lot  of  William  Hopkins  on  the  North  .  .  .  with  an  old  house  and 
orchard  being  upon  it."^ 

This  home  lot  was,  in  171 2,  given  by  will  of  Daniel  Williams  to  his  daughter 
Patience.     (See  Jane  Sears.) 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Edward  Hart  is  now  owned  by  Ellen 
Lynch  and  the  heirs  of  George  B.  Earle. 

Mathew  Weston.  "  The  20th  of  May,  1643.  It  was  agreed  by  the  General 
[people]  that  Mathew  Wesson  shall  have  that  home  share  of  Ground  which  lieth 
between  Robert  Wash  [West]  and  John  Lippitt  also  that  he  shall  have  three  Acres 

I.    Deeds  I,  p.  88.  2.    Deeds  XIX,  p.  506. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  rj 


of  Meadow  Ground  where  he  think  it  most  convenient  which  is  not  already  laid 
out,  but  if  the  said  Mathew  Weson  be  absent  from  the  Town  above  eighteen 
Months  being  neither  Wife  nor  child  here,  the  aforesaid  land  shall  fall  into  the 
Towns  Hand  again."^ 

••27th*''  5'*^  mo.  1650  (called) 

"  Ordered  .  .  .  that  Joshua  Winsor  shall  possess  the  lot  which  was  formerly 
Nathan  [Mathew]  Weston's,  provided  that  the  said  Joshua  Winsor  pay  unto  the 
town  ;^30  S.I 5,  at  the  next  harvest  and  15.  at  the  next  after  in  merchantable  pay 
for  to  be  delivered  for  Nath.  Weston's  use."2 

It  appears  that  Joshua  Winsor  owned  this  lot  October  9,  1663.  "I,  Joshua 
Winsor  ...  my  lot  that  is  called  Mathew  Weston's."^'  And  that  Samuel 
Winsor  was  the  owner  October  30,  1698.     (See  Edward  Hart.") 

The  western  front  of  Mathew  Weston's  home  lot  is  now  owned  by  the  heirs  of 
George  B.  Earle. 

John  Lippitt  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  He  was 
chosen  a  member  of  the  Committee  appointed  to  form  a  plan  of  government  in 
1647.  He  removed  to  Warwick,  his  name  appearing  on  the  roll  of  freemen  of  that 
town  in  1655. 

April  27,  1652,  John  Lippitt  sold  all  his  real  estate  to  Arthur  Fenner,  reserving 
his  home  lot. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  John  Lippitt  is  now  owned  by  Mary  F. 
Gladding,  the  heirs  of  James  H.  Prendergast,  and  Burnet  S.  W.  Bragunn. 

Hugh  Bewit,  "in  Dec.  1640  was  banished  from  Massachusetts.  He  was 
found  guilty  of  heresy,  and  that  his  person  and  errors  are  dangerous  for  the  infec- 
tion of  others.  He  was  ordered  for  this  to  be  gone  out  of  our  jurisdiction  by  the 
24th  inst.  upon  pain  of  death,  and  not  to  return  upon  pain  of  being  hanged."^ 

I.     Trans.,  p.  73.  3.    Trans.,  p.  27. 

Trans.,  p.  142.  4.     Col.  R.  I.  Hist.  Soc'y,  Vol.  II,  p.  ii8. 


2. 


52 


THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


Upon  removing  to  Providence  he  received  a  grant  of  land,  signed  the  compact 
of  1640,  and  became  a  member  of  the  church.  He  was  appointed  to  the  office  of 
Commissioner  for  a  number  of  years,  and  also  served  as  General  Sergeant  and 
Solicitor  General. 

'' if^  II*''  mo.  1644. 

"  Hugh  Bewit  sold  unto  William  Hawkins  his  home  share  of  land  bounding 
on  the  North  with  the  land  of  John  Lippitt  on  the  South  with  the  land  of  the 
said  William  Hawkins  [formerly  the  home  lot  of  Robert  West]  on  the  east  and 
west  with  the  common."^ 

u^yth     jjth     j^Q_     jg^^^ 

"  Hugh  Bewit  sold  unto  the  general  People  of  the  Towne  of  Providence  his 
house  and  home  share  of  ground  [the  home  lot  of  Ezekiel  HoUiman]  bounding 
upon  the  land  of  Richard  Waterman  on  the  North,  on  the  land  of  Stukely  West- 
cott  on  the  South  on  the  east  with  the  common  on  the  west  with  the  highway."^ 

"27*''  11"'  mo.  1650." 

Hugh  Bewit  sold  to  Richard  Waterman  the  home  lot  last  above  described. 

Pardon  Tillinghast  was  in  possession  of  the  home  lot  of  Hugh  Bewit  in  1681, 
as  appears  by  the  following  statement : 

"In  ye  yeare  1681.  When  I  William  Hopkins  of  Providence  was  their  sur- 
veyor did  then  lay  out  unto  Edward  London  one  Lott  [a  warehouse  lot]  above 
high  water  marke  by  ye  water  side  containing  30  foote  square.  It  being  laid  out 
four  poles  distant  from  Pardon  Tillinghast  his  home  lott  which  he  bought  of 
William  Hawkins  Senr.  [originally  Hugh  Bewit's].  The  which  said  lott  is  layed 
out  with  the  like  privileges  as  others  of  the  like  qualitie  have  allowed  them  to  the 
water. 

"  Given  under  my  hand  this  29th  day  of  March  1686 

William  Hopkins."3 

I.    Trans.,  p.  74.  2.    Trans.,  p.  75.  3.     Deeds  I,  p.  137. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  tn 


The  above  mentioned  Pardon  Tillinghast  received  a  "  free  grant  of  Twenty-five 
acres  of  land  the  19th  of  nth  mo.  1645,"  (Jan.  19,  1646.)  He  succeeded  Thomas 
Olney  as  pastor  of  the  Baptist  Church,  and  "  at  his  own  expense  built  the  first 
meeting-house  about  the  year  1 700."  '*  This  house  was  situated  on  the  west  side 
of  North  Main  street,  nearly  opposite  Star  street.  In  171 1,  Mr.  Tillinghast,  in 
consideration  of  the  love  and  good  will  he  bore  the  church  over  which  he  was  then 
pastor,  executed  to  them  and  their  successors  in  the  same  faith  and  order,  a  deed 
of  the  meeting  house  and  the  lot  on  which  it  stood."^  He  died  January  29, 
1717-18. 

By  will,  dated  December  15,  1715,  he  disposed  of  his  home  lot  as  follows : 

"  I  give  to  my  son  Joseph  my  Present  Dwelling  house  and  home  Lott  with  all 
the  privileges  pertaining  thereunto  after  his  mother's  decease  to  be  to  him  and  his 
heirs  forever."^ 

The  Tillinghast  burial  ground  was  located  on  the  home  lot  where  it  still 
remains  undisturbed  near  the  northwest  corner  of  Transit  and  Benefit  streets. 

The  Church  of  the  Saviour,  located  on  the  home  lot  of  Hugh  Bewit,  at  the 
corner  of  Benefit  and  Transit  streets,  was  built  in  1840  by  the  "Corporation  of  St. 
Stephen's  Church,"  and  occupied  by  them  until  1862,  when  they  removed  to  their 
present  place  of  worship  on  George  street.  The  St.  Stephen's  Church  was  organ- 
ized in  1838,  and  the  corner-stone  of  their  first  place  of  worship  was  laid,  on  the 
15th  day  of  April,  1840.^ 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Hugh  Bewit  is  now  owned  by  Cornelius 
O'Leary  and  William  McElroy. 

Robert  West  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  In 
1644  this  home  lot  was  in  the  possession  of  Williams  Hawkins.     (See  Hugh  Bewit.) 

The  home  lot  originally  assigned  to  Edward  Hart  came  into  the  possession  of 
Robert  West,  and  was  by  him  sold  "28*''  i^'  mo.  1679"  (.'*)  to  Resolved  Waterman. 
(See  Edward  Hart.) 

I.     Annals  of  Prov.,  p.  414.  2.     Wills  II,  p.  25.  3.     From  Mr.  George  T.  Hart, 

8 


54 


THE    HOME    LOTS    OF 


Robert  West,  in  1644,  received  ^5  bounty  for  killing  two  wolves. 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Robert  West  is  now  owned  by  Philip 
A.  Munroe  and  Hugh  and  Dennis  Gorman. 

William  Hawkins  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 
He  "  stayed  and  went  not  away  "  during  King  Philip's  war,  and  was  one  of  those  to 
whom  land  in  Narragansett  was  granted  by  the  Assembly  in  1677.  He  also  came 
into  possession  of  the  two  home  lots  next  north  of  his,  namely,  Robert  West's,  in 
1644,  and  Hugh  Bewit's;  also  the  home  lot  of  Joane  Tiler.  He  was  an  early  mem- 
ber of  the  Church  in  Providence. 

"2"'^  day  Feb.  1673. 

"  I,  William  Hawkins  .  .  .  Have  freely  given  .  .  .  unto  my  son 
William  Hawkins  .  .  .  two  house  lots  or  home  shares  of  land  with  all  ye 
housing,  fencing  and  fruit  trees  standing  and  being  upon  ye  said  land  .  .  , 
The  which  said  lotts  or  home  shares  of  land  .  .  .  being  in  ye  Row  of  house 
lotts  .  .  .  Bounding  on  ye  Westerne  side  with  ye  highway  or  Towne  streete 
&  on  ye  Eastern  end  with  a  highway  ...  Bounding  on  ye  Southern  side  with 
a  house  lot  or  home  share  of  land  of  Thomas  Roberts  of  ye  aforesaid  towne  of 
Providence  and  on  ye  Northern  side  with  a  house  lot  or  home  share  of  land  of 
James  Ashton  formerly  inhabitant     ...     of  Providence."^ 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  William  Hawkins  is  now  owned  by  Mrs. 
George  M.  Geehard,  John  Baker,  of  East  Providence,  and  William  W.  Rickard. 

Christopher  Unthank  received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640. 
June  I,  1663 : 

"  I,  Christoper  Unthank  now  of  Warwick,  .  .  .  weaver,  .  .  .  upon 
valuable  consideration  in  hand  already  received  .  .  .  have  sold  unto  Thomas 
Roberts  of  Providence  .  .  .  about  the  year  1658  .  .  .  my  house  and  house 
lot  which  did  belong  to  me  in   Providence,  together  with  a  parcel  of  land  lying 

I.    Deeds  I,  p.  82. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  tc 


beyond  the  Runnet  in  the  sd  lott  which  belongeth  to  Robert  Williams  his  house  lot 
which  I  bought  of  the  said  Robert  Williams,  together  with  all  the  appurtenances 
belonging  to  either,  together  with  all  my  right  &  Privileges  in  all  the  commons  .  .  . 
All  which  parcels  of  land  with  my  house  aforesaid  are  bounded  on  the  south  with 
that  lot  which  at  present  Thomas  Sucklin  possesseth,  on  the  north  with  the  land  of 
William  Hawkins  on  the  East  with  the  Common  &  on  the  West  with  the  highway 
next  to  ye  sea.  .  .  .  Only  that  parcel  of  land  specified  beyond  the  Runnet  is 
bounded  on  the  west  with  the  said  Runnet,  on  the  south  with  the  highway  &  on 
the  East  with  the  common  on  the  North  with  that  parcel  of  land  which  my  house 
stood  upon  which  is  the  home  lot  before  specified."^ 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Christopher  Unthank  is  now  owned  by 
Horace  C.  Tallman,  Mrs.  Daniel  J.  Farrar,  and  William  McElroy. 

Robert  Williams,  who  is  said  to  have  been  a  brother  of  Roger  Williams, 
received  a  home  lot  and  signed  the  compact  of  1640.  In  1648  he  was  appointed 
one  of  the  first  Commissioners  from  Providence ;  he  was  Commissioner  for  165 1-2; 
in  1655,  member  of  the  Town  Council;  in  1664,  Justice  of  the  Peace,  and  General 
Solicitor  in  1673-74. 

27^^  8*  mo.  [Oct.]  1644: 

Robert  Williams  purchased  of  Robert  Morris  the  home  lot  of  Daniel  Abbott 
which  he  sold  Oct.  i,  1665  to  Daniel  Abott,  Jr.     (See  Daniel  Abbott.) 

June  I,  1663 : 

He  sold  his  original  home  lot  to  Christopher  Unthank.    (See  Chris.  Unthank.) 

Feb.  8,  1664-5  • 

"  Robert  Williams  of  Newport  schoolmaster  .  .  .  sold  to  .  .  .  John 
Scott  of  Providence  ...  his  dwelling  house  in  Providence,  with  ye  housing, 
home  share  and  orchard  as  I  bought  them  of  William  Reynolds." 

The  western  front  of  the  home  lot  of  Robert  Williams  is  now  in  the  possession 
of  the  heirs  of  Lydia  J.  Stillwell,  the  Mariners'  Bethel,  and  the  heirs  of  William 
Bradley. 

I.    Deeds  II,  p.  65. 


Plan   showing   ]h& 

Original  Water  Line 

ON   THE  WEST   SIDE  OF 

Providence  River. 


Copyright   bV  Charles  W.  Hopkins. 
I5S5. 


APPENDIX 


ORIGINAL   OWNERS 


OF  THE 


PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS. 

(5ec  Introduction,  fage   VII.) 


Ann'^  1660 


Presented  for  avoyding  (so  much  as  may  be)  future 

Contention 


A  revised  List  (saving  Correction,  with  Addition)  of  Lands- 
and  Meddows,  As  they  were  orriginally  Lotted,  ffrom  the 
beginning  of  the  Plantation  of  Providence,  in  the  Nar- 
regansetts  Bay  in  New  England,  unto  the  (then)  In- 
habitants of   the  said  Plantation,  until  Ann*^  16 


\Illegible^  ordered  by  the   Inha- 

bitants of   the  Towne  for  Composing  the 

Orriginal  List. 


6o 


ORIGINAL     OWNERS     OF 


Home-Lots 


Begining  at  Mile-End-Cove 


Robert  Williams. 
Christopher  Unthanks. 
William  Hawkings. 
Robert  West. 
Hugh  Bewitt.   ' 
John  Lippett. 
Matthew  Wesson. 
Edward  Harte. 
Thomas  Hopkings. 
Widdow  Sayers. 
Widdow  Tylers. 
Nicholas  Powers. 
A  high  Way 
William  Wickenden. 
William  Man. 
William  Barrows. 
Adam  Goodings. 
Thomas  Harris. 
Joshua  Winsor. 
John  ffeild. 
William  ffeild. 
Richard  Scotte. 
Georg  Ricketts. 
John  Warnner. 
Chade  Browne. 
Daniell  Abbott. 
William  Reinolds 
Stutlow  Wescoate 
Ezekiel  Hollyman 


Richard  Waterman, 
ffrancis  Wessons. 
Thomas  Angells. 
Thomas  Olnye. 
Robert  Cole. 

A  high  Way 
William  Carpender, 
John  Sweet. 
Alice  Daniell. 
William  Harris. 
John  Throckmorton. 
Joshua  Vearing. 
Widdow  Reeve.        [Tom.] 
John  Smith. 
John  Greene  Senior. 
Thomas  James. 
William  Arnold. 
Francis  Weekes. 
Benedicte  Arnold 
John  Greene  Junior. 
Edward  Manton 
Thomas  Painter 
Matthew  Waller 
Grigory  Dexter 

Over  Mooshawsick 

River 

John  Smiths  home-Lott 
where  he  build  a  Mille. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  6i 


Sixe  Acres  Lotts 


By  the  River  side,  beginning  at  Mile-End-Cove 

6 :  Acres  of  William  Reinolds. 

6  :  Acres  of  ffrancis  Weekes. 

6  :  Acres  of  John  Throckmortons 

6 :  Acres  of  William  Arnolds.       i     e     • 

6  :  Acres  of  William  Carpenders.  )       , 

.  -.  „        T  ^     A       11      /and  Meere-Banckes. 

6  :  Acres  of  Benedicte  Arnolds. 

6  :  Acres  of  Edward  Copes. 

6  :  Acres  of  Roger  Williams. 

with  What-Cheare. 

In-Lands  next  to  John  Throckmortons 

6 :  Acres  of  William  Harris. 

6 :  Acres  of    William   Wickendens. 

6 :  Acres  of  Nicholas  Powers. 

6 :  Acres  of  William  Mans.  )  ^"^^^^  ^^^h  Wayes. 

A  high  Way 
6  :  Acres  of  William  Hawkings. 

On  the  North-side  of  Wanasquatuckett 

6  :  Acres  of  William  Wickendens 

2  :  Acres  of  Grigory  Dexters,  in  pt  of 

his  6  :  Acre  Lott  — 
6  :  Acres  of  Thomas  Hopkings. 
6 :  Acres  of  John  ffeilds 

Common  and  a  high  Way  through 
6  :  Acres  of  Thomas  Angells 
6 :  Acres  of  Thomas  Olnyes  saving  high  wayes, 
6  :  Acres  of  Stiitlow  Wescoats, 


9 


62  ORIGINAL     OWNERS     OF 

By  the  West-River  neere  New  Bridge 

6  :  Acres  of  Robert  Williams. 
6  :  Acres  of  Joshua  Winsors. 
6 :  Acres  of  Thomas  Harris 

on  Mooshausick-River — 


At  Smale  Brooke 


6o :  Acres  of  Thomas  Angells 
6o :  Acres  of  ffrancis  Weekes 

Over  Smale  Brooke 


30 :  Acres  in  part  of  William  Arnolds  60 :  Acres 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS. 


63 


Lands  and  Meddowes  Lotted 
on  Waubosset  Side 


Begining  at  Saxafrage,  by  the  Water-Side 

Next  the  Townes-Bounds 
A  high-Way 
25  :  Acres  to  William  Arnold,  with  Meddow 
besides  Wast  Ground,  and  a  high  Waye 
crosse  to  Pautuxitt 
A  high-Way 
91  :  Acres  to  Richard  Waterman  with  Meddow. 
60  :  Acres  to  Thomas  Hopkings. 

A  high  Way 
25  :  Acres  to  Nicholas  Power  in  parte  of  William 
Mans  60 :  Acres 

A  high-Way  by  the  side  of  long-Cove 
A  high- Way  on  this  side. of  long-Cove 
20  :  Acres  to  Thomas  Angell. 

A  high-Way 
25  :  Acres  to  Ezechiel  Hollyman,  with  parte  of- 

a  shaire  of  Meddowe. 
25  :  Acres  to  John  Warnner. 
05  :  Acres  to  William    Reinolds,  with  3  Acres-)     .     ^^^^^ 
towards  the  Water  side,  for  his  second  shaire-^      ^  "     ^^^' 
of  meddow. 
05  :  Acres  to  Roger  Williams. 

Severall  high-ways  with  wast  Ground. 
20 :  Acres  to  Robert  Williams,  over  the  high-wayes : 
Saving  (allso)  a  high-way,  by  the  5  Acres-Lotts 
fifive  Acres  Lotts  lying  together 

05  :  Acres  to  John  Throckmorton. 
05  :  Acres  to  Edward  Cope. 


64  ORIGINAL     OWNERS    OF 

05  :  Acres  to  ffrancis  Weekes. 
05  :  Acres  to  Thomas  Angell 
05  :  Acres  to  Thomas  Harris 
05  :  Acres  to  Richard  Scotte 

A  high-Way 
A  swampe  and  the  vacant  land  to 
Robert  WilHams,  for  his  5  :  Acres. 
05  :  Acres  to  WiUiam  Carpender 
05  :  Acres  to  Thomas  Olnye 
05  :  Acres  to  Thomas  James 
05  :  Acres  to  WiUiam  ffeild 

A  high-Way 
05  :  Acres  to  John  ffeild 
05  :  Acres  to  Chade  Browne 
05  :  Acres  to  Daniell  Abbott 
05  :  Acres  to  Adam  Goodings 
05  :  Acres  to  Widdow  Tyler 
05  :  Acres  to  Widdow  Sayers 

A  high-Way 
05  :  Acres  to  Christopher  Unthanks 
05  :  Acres  to  Edward  Heart 

A  high  Way  crossing  the  River 
05  :  Acres  to  Stutlow  Wescoate 
05  :  Acres  to  Benedicte  Arnold,  saving 

a  highway  by  Solentary-hill  w*-  is  Common 
04 :  Acres  to  Benedict  Arnold  in  part 

of  his  20 :  Acres. 
A  crosse  high  Way 
05  :  Acres  to  Thomas  Hopkings. 
05  :  Acres  to  Nicholas  Powers. 
05  :  Acres  to  William  Wickenden 

Saving  high  way 
Halfe  Acre  to  Joshua  Winsor  in 
parte  of  his  5  :  Acres. 
A  high  Way 
>^  03  :  Acres  to  Joshua  Winsor  in  parte 

of  his  5  :  Acres. 
05  :  Acres  to  William  Hawkings 
04 :  Acres  to  Grigory  Dexter  in  parte 
of  his  6 :  Acres. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  65 

A  Meere-Bank  on  the  Plaine 
One  Acre  and  halfe  to  Joshua  Winsor  in  rest 

of  his  5  :  Acres — 
25  :  Acres  to  WilHam  Man. 
25  :  Acres  to  Robert  West 

The  Rest  Common 


In-Land,  beginning  at  Maussaupauoge 

1 50  :  Acres  between  William  Arnold — 

Benedict  Arnold  and  William  Carpender — 

Saving  highe  ways  and  vacant  Land 

Vacant  Land  in  posse  for  John  Greene  Junio"" 

25  :  Acres  of  Robert  Coles  )        ,       ^  .  ^   ^^r 

A  TTr-11-        ^  1     ( -Javmg  high  Waves 

20 :  Acres  to  William  Carpender) 

.  „        .    ,TT  \  ^i^<i  vacant-land — 

91  :  Acres  to  rtrancis  Wesson       ; 

60 :  Acres  to  Adam  Goodings  |  Butting  on  a  Ponde 

80 :  Acres  to  Roger  Williams  J  Saving  high  wayes. 

North-West  from  the  Pondes. 


20 :  Acres  to  John  Throckmorton 

20 :  Acres  to  Edward  Cope — and  his  second 

shaire  of  meddow 

Common  about  halfe  a  mile  \  Saving  high  wayes. 

60 :  Acres  of  Robert  West 
35  :  Acres  of  William  Mans 
60 :  Acres  of  William  Wickendens 

The  Towne  Bounds  with  Common 


In-Land  by  Waunasquetuckett,  On  the  hether 
Plaine,  adjoyning  unto  Robert  Williams  20 :  Acres 

20:  Acres  of  ffrancis  Weekes  |         . 

20 :  Acres  of  Richard  Scotts    J  &     o         j     ' 


66  ORIGINAL     OWNERS    OF 


60 :  Acres  divided  in  20  Acres  a  peece- 

To  William  Harris,  Thomas  Harris  [-  Saving  high  wayes 
and  Widdow  Sayers 
Common 
80 :  Acres  to  John  ffeild 
20 :  Acres  to  Daniell  Abbott 
20 :  Acres  to  Stutlow  Wescoate 
betwext  the  plaines 

On  the  further  Plaine 


Saving  high  wayes 


>  Saving  high  wayes 


60 :  Acres  to  Grigorye  Dexter  saving 

high  wayes 
20 :  Acres  to  Thomas  Hopkings  ] 
20 :  Acres  to  Adam  Goodings      v  Saving  high  wayes 
20  :  Acres  to  Nicholas  Powers      J 
20  :  Acres  to  William  Wickenden  " 
20 :  Acres  to  William  ffield 
16  :  Acres  to  Benedicte  Arnold  in 

the  rest  of  his  20 :  Acres 
20 :  Acres  to  Joshua  Winsor  "j 
20 :  Acres  to  Thomas  James  V  Saving  high  wayes 
20  :  Acres  to  Widdow  Tyler    J 

Beyond  the  Plaine 

85  :  Acres  to  Edward  Manton,  saving 
high-ways 

Neerer  the  River 


60 :  Acres  to  Daniell  Abbott,  saving 
high  wayes 

Neerer  Pauchassett 


25  :  Acres  to  William  Barrowes,  saving 

high  wayes 

Vacant-Lands 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS. 


67 


»■ 


Meddowes 


Beginning  by  the  River-Side,  on  this  side 
Pautuxette-ffalls 
Robert  Coles,  ffirst  Shaire  of  his  Meddowes 
Parte  of  Thomas  Angells  first  Shaire 
Parte  of  Ezechiel  Hollymans  first  Shaire 
ffrancis  Wessons  first  Shaire 
Thomas  James  first  Shaire 
WilHam  Carpenders  first  Shaire 
Parte  of  Richard  Watermans  first  Shaire 
The  other  parte  of  Ezekiel  Hollymans  first  Shaire 
Roger  Williams  ffirst  Shaire 
Parte  of  John  Throckmortons  first  Share 

A  high-way  with  Waubosset  Common 
Another  parte  of  John  Throckmortons  first  Shaire 
The  other  parte  of  Richard  Watermans  first  Shaire 
A  Cove  and  little  Island  for  halfe  an  Acre  of 
Chade  Brownes  first  Shaire 
Part  of  William  Reinolds  first  Shaire 
The  other  parte  of  John  Throckmortons  first  Shaire 
John  Greene  Senio.^  his  ffirst  Shaire 
Joshua  Vearinges  first  Shaire 
William  Harris  first  Shaire 
Parte  of  Thomas  Olnyes  first  Shaire 
In-Land  Meddowes  beginning  at  Mausaupauogg 

Pond 

Robert  Wests  second  Shaire 

William  Wickendens  second  Shaire 

Daniel  Abbotts  first  Shaire  on  Spectacle  Pond 

William  Mans  second  Shaire 

Meaddowes  at  Paushausett  River 


Edward  Hearts  first  Shaire 


68  ORIGINAL     OWNERS    OF 

Christopher  Unthanks  first  Shaire 
Thomas  Hopkings  first  Shaire 
Widow  Sayers  first  Shaire 
William  ffeilds  first  Shaire. 

Inland  meddowes  upon  the  same  River 

John  Lippetts  second  Shaire 
Joshua  Winsors  second  Shaire 
Chade  Brownes  second  Shaire 
Roger  Williams  second  Shaire  by 
the  five  Trees. 

On  the  hither  Side  of  Paushausett  River. 

Hugh  Bewitts  first  Shaire 
William  Barrowes  first  Shaire. 

ffrom  the  River  of  Waunasquetuckett 

Halfe  of  Edward  Mantons  second  Shaire 

Edward  Mantons  ffirst  Shaire 

William  Mans  ffirst  Shaire 

Robert  Wests  ffirst  Shaire 

The  other  halfe  of  Edward  Mantons  second  Shaire 

Daniel  Abbotts  second  Shaire. 

Neerer  Waunasquetuckett  River. 

Stutlow  Wescoats  first  Shaire 
Benedicte  Arnolds  first  Shaire. 


THE    PROVIDENCE    PLANTATIONS.  69 


Meddowes  On  the  Townes  Side 

Beginning  at  Waunasquetuckett  River 

An  other  parte  in  parcells  of  Thomas  Olnyes  Meddowes 

William  Arnolds  first  Shaire 

Other  parcells  of  Thomas  Olnyes  Meddowes 

Matthew  Wallers  Swampe  for  his  second  Shaire 

An  other  Part  )     .  „,  ^,  ,t    1 1 

_        ■  of   1  homas  Olnyes  Meddowes 
An  other  Part  J 

The  other  Part  of  William  Reinolds  first  Shaire  with 

An  Island 

At  Smale  Brooke  «fe« 


Thomas  Hopkings  second  Shaire 
William  Hawkings  second  Shaire 
Grigorye  Dexters  second  Shaire 
ffrancis  Weekes  second  Shaire 

Over  Samale  Brooke 


Grigorye  Dexters  first  Shaire 
John  ffeilds  Shaire 

Upon  Maushausett  River,  on  the  Necke  Side 

Part  of  Thomas  Harris  second  Shaire 

Part  of  ffrancis  Weekes  first  Shaire 

Part  of  Richard  Scotts  first  Shaire 

The  other  part  of  Thomas  Angells  first  Shaire 

The  other  part  of  Richard  Scotts  first  Shaire 

William  Wickendens  first  Shaire 

At  the  Greate  Meddowe 


John  ffeilds  first  Shaire 

John  Warnners  first  Shaire 

Thomas  Harris  second  Shaire  —  in  pt. 


10 


7° 


THE    HOME    LOTS. 


Christopher  Unthanks  first  Shaire 
Widdow  Tylers  first  Shaire 
John  Throckmortons  second  Shaire 
Thomas  Olnyes  second  Shaire 
John  Greenes  Junio.^  first  Shaire 
Meddowe  Common 
Widdow  Sayers  second  Shaire 

Meddowe  Common 
On  the  West  Side 

Meddowe  Common 
Nicholas  Powers  second  Shaire 
John  Greene  Senio.^  his  second  Shaire 
John  Smith  5  Acres  and  |  in  case  he 

builde  a  Mill 
Adam  Goodings  second  Shaire 
John  Smith  3  :  Acres  and  \  in  case  he 

builde  a  Mill 
Nicholas  Powers  first  Shaire 
Adam  Goodings  first  Shaire 
William  ffeilds  first  Shaire 
Joshua  Winsors  first  Shaire 
The  other  part  of  Chade  Brownes  first  Shaire 
Edward  Copes  first  Shaire 

On  the  West  River 

Thomas  Angells  second  Shaire 
Christopher  Unthanks  second  Shaire 
Widdow  Tylers  second  Shaire 

South-Side  on  the  West  River 

Robert  Williams  two  Shaires 
William  Barrows  second  Shaire 
The  other  part  of  Thomas  Harris  second  Shaire 
The  other  part  of  ffrancis  Weekes  Meddow 
upon  Pautuckett  River. 


City  of  Providence, 

City  Clerk's  Office, 
City  Hall,  June  15,  1886. 


1 


The  aforegoing  is  a  correct  copy  of  "A  revised  List  (saving  Correction,  with 
Addition)  of  Lands  and  Meddows,  As  they  were  orriginally  Lotted,  ffrom  the 
beginning  of  the  Plantation  of  Providence,  in  the  Narregansetts  Bay  in  New 
England,  unto  the  (then)  Inhabitants  of  the  said  Plantation,  until  Ann^  16  ," 
as  appears  on  file  in  this  office. 


INDEX. 


Abbott,  Daniel,  14,  32,  38,  39,  40,  41,  42,  43,  55,  60,  64, 

66,  67,  68. 
Acknowledgment,  vii. 
Adams,  A.  B.,33,  47,  48. 
Agreement,  first,  15. 
Algeirs,  30. 
Almy,  Humphrey,  17. 
Ames,  William,  29. 
Amesburj,  32. 
Angell,  James,  35,  36. 
John,  35,  36. 
"        Thomas,  3,  14,  15,  34,  35,  36,  60,  61,  62,  63, 64, 
67,  69,  70. 
Angells,  34. 
Apaum,  5. 
Appendix,  57. 

Arnold,  Benedict,  5,  6,  15,  32,  60,  61,  64,  65,  66,  68. 
Estate  Co.,  47. 
"        Fred.  A.,  28. 
"        Richard  J.,  47. 
"        Samuel  G.,  47. 
"        Thomas,  32. 
"        Welcome,  47. 

William,  4,  9,  10,  23,  24,  25,  32,  36,  60,  61,  62. 
63,  65,  69. 
Asht<  n,  James,  54, 
Assotemewett,  5,  6. 
Ajlesworth,  Hiram  B.,  38. 

Bailey,  William  M.,  41. 
Baker,  John,  54. 

"      Thomas,  39,  41. 


Balch,  Joseph,  estate,  43. 
Baptist  church,  19,  35,  36,  37,  39,  44,  47,  53. 
Barbadoes,  28. 
Barbary  Corsair,  30. 
Barrows,  William.     (See  Burrows.) 
Benedict's  History  of  the  Baptists,  36. 
Benefit  street,  22,  23,  25,  53. 
Bennett,  Samuel,  38. 
Bewit,  Hugh,  37,  51,  52,  53,  54,  60,  68. 
Book  Notes,  3. 
Boston,  2,  40,  42. 
Bowen  street,  17. 
Bradley,  William,  heirs,  55. 
Bragunn,  Burnet  S.  W.,  51. 
Breck,  Thomas,  38. 
Bridgewater,  44. 
Bristol,  England,  29. 

Brown,  Chad,    10,  15,  38,  39,  40,  41,  42,  43,  47,  60,  64, 
67,  68,  70. 

"      Daniel,  30. 

"      Elizabeth,  40. 

"       Henry,  21,  22. 

"      Isaac,  44. 

"      James,  40. 

"      John,  9,  40,  42,  47, 

"      John  Carter  estate,  23,  41,  42. 

"      Joseph,  44. 

"       Nathaniel,  27,  28,  43. 
Brown  University,  39,  40. 
Bryant,  Alexander,  24,  25. 
Bullock,  Julia,  49. 
Burrows,  William,  46,  47,  60,  66,  68,  70. 


74 


INDEX. 


Calder,  Albert  L.,  31. 

"       Emerj  H.,  20. 

'•       Mrs.  George  B.,  26. 

"       Mrs.  William  H.,  20. 
Cambridge  Universitj,  2. 
Canonicus,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  10. 
Carder,  Richard,  36. 
Carpenter,  Joseph,  12. 
"  Richard,  32. 

"  William,  9,   13,    17,  32,  34,   36,  60,61,64, 

65,  67. 
Charitable  Baptist  Society,  36. 
Church  of  England,  27. 

"       King's,  27. 

"        in  Providence,  54. 

"       of  the  Saviour,  53. 
St.  John's,  27. 
St.  Stephen's,  53. 
Clarke,  Rev.  John,  16. 
Cole,  John,  33. 

"     Mary,  33. 

"     Robert,  9,  13,  14,  15,  32,  33,  34,  36,  60,  65,  67. 
Compact  of  1640,  15. 
Conanicut,  25. 
Condy,  William,  30. 
Congdon,  Sarah  A.,  50. 
Congregational  Society,  40. 
Conscience,  Liberty  of,  7,  i6,  27.. 
Cope,  Edward,  15,  61,  63,  65,  70. 
Cornwall,  i. 
Crawford,  Gideon,  44. 
Cromwell,  17,  20. 
Crooker,  Josiah  W.,  21. 

Dana,  Newton  C,  27. 
Daniels,  Alice,  26,  31,  60. 

"        Sophia,  27. 
Dartmouth,  23,  46. 

Deed  of  Lands,  from  Indian  chiefs,  3,  4,  7. 
Initial,  8,  9. 
Confirmatory,  10. 
Deming,  Morris,  21. 

"        Thomas  D.,  21, 


1  (      ( t 


X  II 


Dexter,  Gregory,  10,  19,  20,  21,  39,  60,  61,  64,  66,  69. 
"        Maj.  John,  27,  29. 
*'       Newton,  38. 
"       Peleg,  20. 
Dexter's  lane,  13,  19,  20. 
Dickens,  Nathaniel,  48,  49. 
Dorchester,  26,  35. 
Dorr,  Henry  C,  vi,  39. 
Durfee,    Mrs.    Sarah   J.    S.,    wife    of    Chief-Justice 

Thomas,  25. 
Dyer,  Charles,  27,  28,  43. 
"       Mary,  29. 
"       William,  29. 

Earl,  Ralph,  48,  49. 
Earle,  George  B.,  51. 

"       George,  heirs  of,  49,  50. 

"      Julia,  49. 

"      Marcy  A.,  49. 
England,  2,  22,  23,  25,  29,  32,  33,  37,  39,  44,  50. 
Evening  Telegram,  3. 


Farrar,  Mrs.  Daniel  J.,  55. 
Felt's  Annals  of  Salem,  36. 
Fenner,  Arthur,  51. 

"      John,  21. 
Fenner's  Wharf,  47. 
Field,  Mrs.  Deborah,  40,  42. 

"      John,  15,  43,  44,  60,  61,  66,  69. 

"      Thomas,  43,  44,  45. 

"      William,  10,  I2,  24,  25,  41,  43,  44,  46,  60,  64,  66, 
68,  70. 
Field's  Point,  43. 
Fletcher,  Joseph,  29. 
Foster  Papers,  28. 
Fox  Point,  3. 
Fox's  hill,  7. 
Fox's  converts,  29. 
France,  30. 

Friends'  Society,  39,  32. 
Fuller,  O.  P.,  vi. 
Furlong,  Thomas,  31. 


INDEX. 


75 


Gammell,  Elizabeth  A.,  wife  of  William,  42. 

Garrison  house,  43,  44. 

Gaspee,  46,  47. 

Geehard,  Mrs.  George  M.,  54. 

Gibbs,  Robert,  46. 

Gladding,  Mary  F.,  51. 

Goddard,  Robert  H.  I.,  42. 

Goddard,  William,  heirs,  35. 

Godfrey',  Ljdia  A.,  50. 

Goodwin,  Adam,  45,  46,  60,  64,  65,  66,  70. 

Gorman,  Dennis,  54. 

Hugh,  54. 
Greene,  Allen,  22. 

"        Anna  O.,  29. 

"        Cornelia  C,  48. 

John,  9,  10,  35,  26,  31,  36,  60,  67,  70. 
John,  Jr.,  32,  36,  60,  65,  70. 
Mary,  25. 

"        Gen.  Nathanael,  26. 

"        Richard,  25. 

"        Rufus,  44. 
Guild,  Reuben  Aldridge,  39. 
Gwinear,  i,  2. 


Hampton,  25. 

Harris,  Thomas,  9,  10,  15,  45,  46,  60,  62,  64,  66,  69,  70. 
William,  3,  4,  5,  9,   10,  15,  29,  30,  31,  36,  45, 
60,  61,  66,  67. 
Hart,  Edward,  49,  50,  51,  53,  60,  64,  67. 

"      George  T.,  53. 
Hawkins,  William,  49,  52,  54,  55,  60,  61,  64,  69. 
Henshaw,  Mrs.  Charles  H.,  33,  47. 
Hertford,  35,  37. 
Hingham,  23.  ^ 

Hodges,  Mrs.  Raymond  G.,  26. 
Holliman,  Ezekiel,  9,  14,  36,37,  52,  60,  63,  67. 
Home  Lots,  Assignment,  v. 

**        "        Original  owners,  iii,  vii,  19,  60. 

"        "        Size  and  location,  13,  14,  19. 
Hooker,  Mary,  35. 
Hope  street,  v,  13. 
Hopkins,  Gov.,  42. 

*'        Thomas,  50,  60,  61,  63,  64,  66,  68,  69. 


Hopkins,  William,  49,  50,  52. 
Howard,  Elizabeth  S.,  45,  46. 

•'        Ezra,  W.,  46, 
Howe,  Mrs.  Reginald,  33,  47. 
Howland  street,  17. 
Hutchinson,  Mrs.,  42. 

India  Point,  3. 

Indians,  7,  13,  17,  22,  43. 

Initial  Deed,  8. 

James,  Thomas,  9,  24,  25,  36,  60,  64,  66,  67. 
Joslin,  Henry  V.  A.,  City  Clerk,  71. 

Kelley,  Ebenezer,  estate,  23. 

Kendrick,  George,  41. 

Kent  County,  7, 

King  Philip,  3. 

King  Philip's  War,  38,  43,  54. 

Knowles'  Memoirs  of  Roger  Williams,  2,  3. 

Landmarks,  13,  14. 
Lapham,  John,  46,  47. 
Mary,  46,  47. 
"         Nicholas,  46. 
Lincolnshire,  17. 
Lippitt,  John,  50,  51,  52,  60,  68. 
List  of  Home  Lots,  iii,  19,  60. 

List   of  Original   Owners  of  the   Providence  Planta- 
tions, 59. 
Littleworth,  50. 
London,  30,  34,  41, 
London,  Edward,  52. 
I.,ong  Cove,  63. 
Long  Island,  50, 
Lynch,  Ellen,  50. 

Man,  Anna  H.,  35. 

"     Eliza  F.,  35. 

"      William,  46,  47,  48,  60,  61,  63,  65,  67,  68. 
Manning,  James,  39. 

Manton,  Edward,  20,  21,  23,  31,  60,  66,  68. 
"       Shadrac,  21,  31. 


76 


INDEX. 


Manton's  Neck,  3. 
Manners'  Bethel,  55. 
Martyrs,  29,  35. 
Mashapauge,  5,  6,  10,  65,  67. 
Maushausett  River,  69. 
Massachusetts,  5,  32,  33,  35,  42,  51. 

"  soldiers  attack  Warwick,  25,  26. 

Massasoit,  3. 

McElroy,  William,  53,  55. 
Meeting  street,  13,  14,  32. 
Memorandum  Deed,  8. 
Metcalf,  John,  22. 

"       Matilda,  17. 
Miantonomi,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,   10,  26. 
Mile-End  Cove,  vii,  19,  60,  61. 
Mill,  first  in  Providence,  27,  60,  70. 
Milton,  17. 

Mooshausick,  i,  4,  6,  8,  9,  10,  60,  62. 
Morris,  Robert,  38,  39,  55. 
Munroe,  Philip  A.,  54. 

Nanhiggansick,  4,  6. 
Narragansett,  54,  59. 

"  Bay  and  Indians,  2,  3. 

Neotaconkonitt,  4,  6,  10. 
New  Bridge,  62. 
Newell,  Mary  K.,  26. 
New  England,  2. 

Newport,  5,  30,  36,  37,  38,  40,  41,  55. 
New  Providence,  8. 
New  York,  47. 

North  Main  street,  v,  13,  17,  53. 
Noyes,  Samuel  M.,  33. 

Occupasnatuxet,  26. 

O'Leary,  Cornelius,  53. 

Olney  street,  13,  19,  20. 

Olney,  Thomas,  4,  5,  9,  10,    14,  24,  32,  33,  34,  36,  53, 

61,  67,  69,  70. 
Olney,  Thomas,  Jr.,  6,  32,  33. 

"       William,  32,  33,  34. 
Original  Owners  of  Providence  Plantations,  59, 
Osborn,  Richard,  45. 
Ousamequin,  3. 
Oyster  Bay,  50. 


Painter,  Thomas,  20,  21,  60. 
Patten,  Eliza  B.,  38. 
Pauchassett  River,  66,  67,  68. 
Pautucket,  4,  5,  6,  10. 

"  River,  3,  70. 

Pautuxet,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  23,  30,  33,  63. 
"  purchase,  12,  25. 

"         Falls,  67. 
Peckham,  Mary  R.,  20. 
Pendergast,  James  H.,  51. 
Planet  street,  46,  47. 
Plymouth,  5. 
Plymouth  Patent,  3. 
Portsmouth,  37. 
Power,  Jane,  48. 

"        Nicholas,  13,  48,  49,  60,  61,  63,  64,  66,  70. 
"        street,  13,  14,  48. 
Power's  lane,  13. 
Pray,  Richard,  33,  34. 

"      William,  34. 
Providence,  Settlement  of,  i. 

"  Origin  of  name,  3,  10. 

"         Time  of  settlement,  3. 
"  First  settlers,  3,  7,  10. 

"         Town  evidence,  4. 
"         Grand  purchase  of,  12, 

Bank,  43,  44. 
"         Institution  for  Savings,  44,  47. 
«'  County,  7. 

"         Journal,  3. 
Publique  stock,  11. 
Puritans,  2. 

Quakers,  42. 
Quinitikticutt,  5. 

Reeve,  Widow,  27,  29,  43,  60. 

Rehoboth,  28. 

Reynolds,  William,  14,  15,38,  41,  55,  60,  61,  63,  67,  69. 

Rhode  Island,  16. 

"  "       Colonial  Records,  46. 

"  "       Historical  Tracts,  vi, 

"  "  "  Society  Collection,  26. 

"  "      Hospital  Trust  Co.,  43. 


INDEX. 


77 


Rhodes,  James  T.,  estate,  38. 

Richmond,  Harriet  T.,  17. 

Rickard,  George,  15,  40,  41,  42,  43,  60. 

William  W.,  54. 
Rider,  Sidney  S.,  3. 
Right,  Samuel,  29,  30. 
Rivers,  Mary  T.,  27. 
Roberts,  Thomas,  54. 
Russell,  Hope  B.,  41. 

Sabin,  James,  47. 

Salem,  2,  3,  7,  27,  28,  33,  35,  36,  37,  47. 
Sayers,  Widow,  60,  64,  66,  68,  70. 
Sayles,  John,  9,  30,  48,  49. 

"       Mr.,  48. 

"       Widow,  49,  60. 
Saxafrage,  63, 
Scott,  John,  27,  29,  38,  39,  55. 

"      Richard,  15,  27,  28,  29,  42,  43,  44,  60,  64,  65,  69. 
Sears,  Jane,  49,  50. 
Seekonk,  3. 
Seven  Mile  Line,  45. 
Shawomet,  22,  26,  33,  36,  41. 
Shepard,  Elizabeth  A.,  42. 
Shepard's  lott,  45. 
Six  acre  lots,  61. 
Small  Brook,  62,  69. 
Small,  Mary,  33. 
Smith,  Edward,  32. 

"      John,  miller,  3,  26,  27,  60,  70. 

"      John  W.,  trustee,  48,  49. 

"       Thomas,  12. 
Snow,  Mrs.  James,  Jr.,  29. 
Soatash,  5,  6. 
Solentary  Hill,  64. 
South  Court  Street,  32. 
South  Main  Street,  13,  46,  47. 
Spain,  30. 

Spring  Green  Farm,  22,  26. 
Staples'  Annals  of  Providence,  v,  8,  15. 
Star  Street,  53. 

II 


State  House,  31. 
Steere,  Henry  J.,  22,  45. 
Steere,  Rhoda,  48. 
Stillwell,  Lydia  J.,  55. 
Stone,  Rev.  Edwin  M.,  vi. 
Sucklin,  Thomas,  55. 
Sweet,  John,  31,  60. 

Tallman,  Horace  C,  55. 

Tattersall,  Joan,  25. 

Ten  Mile  River,  3. 

Thayer,  William,  49. 

Thomas  street,  14,  34. 

Throckmorton,  John,  9,   10,   24,  25,  29,  39,  60,  6i,  63, 

65,  67,  70. 
Throckmorton,  Mr.,  48. 
Thurber,  George  J.,  27. 
Tiler,  Joane,  49,  54,  60,  64,  66,  70. 
Tillinghast  burial  gi-ound,  14,  53. 
Joseph,  53. 
"  Pardon,  20,  21,  52,  53. 

Towne  booke,  10. 

"      evidence,  4,  6. 

"      streete,  13. 

"      stock,  16. 
Transit  street,  53. 
Tring,  37. 
Tyler,  Widow,  49,  54,  60,  64,  66,  70. 

Updike,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  B.,  33,  47. 

Unthank,  Christopher,  48,  54,  55,  60,  64,  68,  70. 

Vane,  Sir  Henry,  17,20. 
Van  Zandt,  Mrs.  A.  G.,  41. 
Verin,  Joshua,  3,  27,  28,  29,  43,  60. 

Wallace,  Wm.  V.,  33. 

Waller,  Matthew,  20,  21,  60,  69. 

Warnard,  Mai-y,  2. 

Warner,  John,  vi,  15,  31,  42,  60,  63,  69, 

Warwick,  vi,  16,  26,  31,  35,  37,  38,  41,  51,  54. 

"         Earl  of,  16. 
Waterman,  Ann,  49. 


78 


INDEX. 


Waterman,  Nathaniel,  35. 
"  Resolved,  50,  53. 

Richard,  9,  10,  14,  36,  37,  38,  49,  50,  52,  60, 
63,  67. 
Waubosset,  63,  67. 

Wanasquatucket,  4,  6,  8,  9,  10,  61,  65,  68,  69. 
Weekes,  Francis,  see  Wickes. 
West  Providence  Land  Co.,  48. 
West  River,  62,  70. 

West,  Robert,  50,  53,  54,  60,  65,  67,  68. 
Westcoat,  Amasa  S.,  41. 

Stukely,  9,  10,  14,  36,  37,  38,  52,  60,  61,  64, 

66,  68. 

Weston,  Francis,  9,  14,  34,  35,  36,  60,  65,  67. 
"         Matthew,  50,  51,  60. 
"         Nathan,  51. 
What  Cheer,  3. 

"  "       Building,  vi,  14. 

Whipple,  John,  22,  23,  24,  25. 
"        John,  Jr.,  28. 
"        Joseph, 25. 
"        Samuel,  28. 
"        tavern,  23. 
Whitman,  Valentine,  30,  31. 
Wickenden  street,  v,  13,  14,  19. 

William,  10,  13,   15,  47,  48,  60,  64,  65,  66, 

67,  69. 

Wickes,  Francis,  3,  15,  23,  24,  60,  61,  62,  64,  65,  69,  70. 
Williams,  Daniel,  29,  30,  31,  46,  48,  49,  50. 
"         Joseph,  28. 
"  Mary,  12. 

"  Patience,  49. 

*'  Rebekah,  49. 

Robert,  10,  38,  39,  55,  60,  62,  63,  64,  65,  70. 
"  Roger: 

parentage,  i,  2. 

baptism,  i,  2,  37. 

education,  2. 

wife's  maiden  name,  2 

sails  for  America,  3. 

arrives  at  Boston,  2. 

banishment,  2. 

letter  to  Major  Mason,  2. 


Williams,  Roger:  (Continued.) 

landing  at  Providence,  3. 

purchases  land  of  the  Indians  3. 

witness  to  confirmation  of  deed  by  Mian- 
tinomi,  5,  6. 

sole  proprietor  of  lands,  7,  10,  11. 

mortgaged  his  house  at  Salem,  7. 

purpose  in  learning  the  Indian  language,  7. 

initial  deed  to  associates,  8,  9. 

confirmatory  deed  to  associates,  10,  ii,  12. 

gratuities  to  Indians,  11,  12. 

Pawtuxet  lands,  12. 

sails  for  England,  16. 

Key  to  the  Indian  Language,  16,  19. 

returns  to  Providence,  with  charter,  16. 

second  voyage  to  England,  16. 

chosen  president  of  the  colony,  17. 

appointed  to  write  letters  to  Cromwell  and 
others,  20. 

testimony  before  commissioners,  26,  39. 

accompanied  by  Joshua  Verin,  27. 

accompanied  by  John  Throckmorton,  29. 

opposed  by  William  Harris,  30. 

Thomas  Angell,   "  a  young  lad  living  in 
his  family,"  34. 

member  of  the  first  church,  36,  37. 

lands,  17,  61,  63,  65,  67,  68. 

list  of  home  lots,  vii. 

son  Daniel,  49. 

brother  Robert,  55. 

preaches  to  the  Indians,  17. 

death,  17. 
Williams,  William,  2. 
Wiltshire,  32. 
Windsor,  44. 
Winslow,  Gov.,  3. 
Winsor,  Joshua,  15,  44,  45,  50,  51,  60,  62,  64,  65,  66,  68, 

70. 
Winsor,  Samuel,  44,  49,  50,  51. 
Winthrop,  Gov.,  2. 
Wolves,  24,  54. 
Woods,  Marshall,  41. 
Wright,  Samuel,  29,  30. 


BRIGHAM  YOUNG  UNIVERSITY 


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